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Senior Health Blog

  • Spread Fun, Not Flu

    Kathryn Ekstrom, MD, Pediatrics & Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Morganfield


    I don’t know about you, but I don’t have time to be sick with the flu.  A week or more of serious body aches, coughing, fever, etc. is not how I want to spend my time. Be prepared by getting your flu vaccine before flu season starts! 

  • Micra, the World's Smallest Pacemaker

    Nathan Reed, MD, Cardiovascular Electrophysiologist, Deaconess Heart Group
     
    Micra is the world’s smallest pacemaker, leaving no bump under the skin, no chest scar, and requiring no lead. I would describe the device as a quantum leap in pacemaker technology, and a large improvement for patients who need single-chamber pacing.
     

  • Adult Vaccines

    Rebekah Basham, PA, Deaconess Clinic Mary Street

    Most people are aware pediatric vaccinations are very important and prevent serious diseases and related complications. However, people often forget there are adult vaccinations and boosters that are recommended to keep us healthy and prevent complications associated with certain infections. 

  • Learn Your Heart Risk with Heart Scan

    R. Scott Starrett, MD, FACC, FSCAI, Deaconess Heart Group

    If you’re concerned about your risk for heart disease, a heart scan may be helpful for you. Deaconess is excited to now offer this new screening option to the community for only $49. As a physician, I know that this test has the potential to prevent heart attacks and save lives.

  • Importance of a Health Care Representative

    Dr. Anna Dauer, Medical Director, Deaconess Palliative Care

    Here at Deaconess, people make decisions on others’ behalf every single day. Sometimes the situation is sudden, such as after a car crash. In other situations, a family member has been in a gradual decline. But in all circumstances it can be a difficult time, so having the right information, with the desired decision-makers, is crucial.

  • 8 Healthy & Fit Summer Vacation Tips

    Helen Schnarr, Clinical Dietitian, Deaconess 

    Vacation is a great time to reduce stress and rejuvenate your mind, body and spirit. It’s not, however, the time to turn back on healthy lifestyle changes you worked on through the winter and spring months. Here are a few ways to maintain healthy habits when you’re out of town and out of your normal routine.
     

  • Conservative Treatments for Joint Pain

    Rhiannon Anderson, PA, Orthopaedic Associates

    Experiencing joint pain? Surgery is not your only option. There are many conservative (non-surgical) options that can provide significant relief from joint pain.

  • Chronic Kidney Disease

    Narothama Reddy, MD, Deaconess Clinic Nephrology

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is very common—affecting about 14 percent of the US adult population. It’s closely related to diabetes and high blood pressure, and can cause serious complications.

  • Keeping Resolutions in the New Year

    Sara Bueltel, RD, CD, Deaconess Weight Loss Solutions

    It’s that time of year again! New Year’s Day is around the corner and many of us are starting to think about making a resolution. But how do you stick to your resolution and not give up before Valentine’s Day? We’ve listed some tips below on how to make and keep momentum toward your New Year’s resolution throughout the year.

  • Managing the Pain of Shingles

    Sridhar Bhaskara, MD, Deaconess Comprehensive Pain Centers

    Shingles is a common, painful rash that will affect up to 1 in 5 people. Identifying and treating shingles quickly can prevent further pain and long-term complications.

  • Healthy Holiday Tips from The Heart Hospital

    The Deaconess Heart Group

    Learn about these healthy tips and why they’re important to you. 

  • What Is Palliative Care?

    Dr. Anna Dauer, Deaconess Palliative Care Medical Director, and Andrea Lantz, LCSW, Palliative Care Clinical Social Worker

    Perhaps you’ve heard the term “palliative care” but weren’t sure what it meant. Palliative care is specialized medical care for people with chronic illnesses, focusing on providing patients with relief from the symptoms, pain and stress of a chronic illness regardless of the diagnosis. The overall goal is to improve quality of life for both the patient and the family.
     

  • Resources for Family Caregivers

    Lorrie Fox, ACSW, LCSW, Care Coordinator at Deaconess Primary Care for Seniors, and Ariel Myers from Deaconess VNA Home Care and Hospice

    Caregiving for an aging loved one can be both rewarding and challenging. Many caregivers don’t know about resources and services that can help make their jobs easier and improve the quality of life for themselves and their loved one.

  • Painful Bladder--Could It Be Interstitial Cystitis?

    Amanda Phelps-Jones, WHNP-BCPelvic Health & Wellness Center at The Women’s Hospital

    Interstitial cystitis (I.C.) is a problem with the lining of the bladder and is often called painful bladder syndrome or irritable bladder – and for good reasons, it's painful! I.C. occurs mostly in women, is underdiagnosed and often mistaken for a urinary tract infection.
     

  • Understanding CHF (Congestive Heart Failure)

    Brian Wellington, DO, Deaconess Clinic Henderson- Starlite

    Congestive heart failure, or CHF, is a very common, serious chronic condition and it’s a factor in 1 in 9 deaths. It's important to understand how your heart should work properly, and what happens when it doesn’t. 
     

  • Know Where to Go For Care

    Amanda Bohleber, MD, Medical Director, Deaconess Clinic

    A doctor—and mom—shares her tips for choosing the right care at the right time at the right place.

  • Making the Most of Your Doctor’s Appointment

    Ankita Bahuva, MD, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Downtown

    Your doctors’ appointments are an important and valuable time to connect with your doctor, share your perspective and information, and learn from your doctor’s expertise.  The best appointments happen when patients are very prepared.
     

  • Fighting Chronic Fatigue

    Ankita Bahuva, MD, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Downtown

    Chronic fatigue is a condition that causes someone to be extremely tired—to the point that they can’t function in their daily life.  It is also often misunderstood.
     

  • Emergency Preparedness for Patients with Health Problems

    Jim Hays, Deaconess Home Medical Equipment, and Tom Fite, R.Ph, Manager, Deaconess Family Pharmacy

    Recent national disasters have caused many people to give more thought to emergency preparedness.  As September is Emergency Preparedness Month, it’s a great time to be thinking about being disaster ready.
     

  • Which Cancer Screenings You Need, When, and WHY

    Mohammed Allaw, MD Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Gateway Professional Building

    Cancer screening recommendations can be confusing for many people--in my 20 years of practicing primary care medicine for adults, thousands of patients have had questions about various cancer screenings. 

    In this article, I’ll focus on breast, prostate, lung, colon and skin cancer screenings.

  • An Urgent Need to Solve Your Annoying Problem – Overactive Bladder

    Adam Becker, MD, Urology, Deaconess Clinic

    Do you experience frequent urination or a persistent “urgent feeling” to urinate? If so, then you may have a urinary disorder known as Overactive Bladder (OAB).


     

  • Health Screenings Men Need - When & Why

    Michael Luy, MD, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Downtown

    Health screenings help doctors and other providers detect conditions at earlier, more treatable stages.

  • The ABCs of Hepatitis

    Rubin Bahuva, MD, Gastroenterologist, Deaconess Clinic
     
    You’ve likely heard of hepatitis, and you may’ve even heard that some types of hepatitis are identified by letters A, B, & C. I’m glad to be writing about this, as so many people don’t know enough about hepatitis. It’s a serious issue, as hepatitis can cause serious illness and severe liver damage. Hepatitis C in particular is of concern, as more than 3 million Americans are infected—mostly “Baby Boomers.” Hepatitis C is actually the most common reason people need a liver transplant.

  • Myths & Facts about Hospice

    Cheryl Arnold, Hospice Manager, Deaconess VNA

    There are many questions and misunderstandings about hospice. Hospice can be an emotionally-charged topic, so knowing and understanding the facts about hospice care can help make conversations and decisions easier.

    Below, I address some of the most common myths, or incorrect beliefs, about hospice, and share additional information about why hospice is a wonderful service and resource for families when a loved one has a terminal condition. 

  • Preventing & Treating Osteoporosis

    Dr. Darla Grossman, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic West

    Osteoporosis, a condition in which bones become weak and brittle, is a common condition that can have serious consequences—including premature death from complications of broken bones.

  • Health Benefits of Giving

    We all know that it’s “good” to give. Giving to charitable causes helps these organizations to continue functioning, providing services, and helping the community. But did you know that giving is actually good for your physical and mental health? 

  • Knowing the Signs of Alzheimer’s

    Aziz Mehrzad, MD, Deaconess Primary Care for Seniors
     

    More than 5 million people in the US suffer from Alzheimer’s Disease, and it is currently the 6th leading cause of death in this country—more than prostate and breast cancer combined.  

  • Fall Prevention: Steps to Make Falls Less Likely

    Deaconess Regional Trauma Team

    Lack of exercise can lead to weak legs, which increases the chance of falling. Exercise programs can increase strength and improve balance, making falls less likely.


     

  • Understanding Sepsis

    Ruston Stoltz MD, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic
     
    Sepsis is a serious complication of an infection, and it can happen to anyone.  Young or old, sepsis can be life threatening, as between ¼ and ½ of all individuals who develop sepsis will die from it.

  • 10 Choices to add years to your life

    Terry Gehlhausen, DO, Deaconess Clinic Family Medicine, Oakland City

    People who follow a few simple steps to improve their health have less cancer and heart disease compared to other Americans, and their overall death rate is significantly reduced compared to other people under age 65. Here are ten choices you can make that will lead to a longer and healthier life:
     

  • COPD: Catching Your Breath

    James Gutmann, MD, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic
     
    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a lesser-known respiratory disease but is every bit as dangerous and difficult to manage as asthma.  COPD is an umbrella term for a grouping of specific symptoms that are incurable but manageable with appropriate treatment and lifestyle adjustments.


     

  • Health Benefits of Tai Chi

    John Hufstedler, Deaconess Cross Pointe social work therapist, Tai Chi instructor
     
    Tai chi—you’ve probably heard of it and even seen it before, but you may not know exactly what it is. 
     

  • Tips for Aging Healthier & Happier

    Becky Richardville, MSW, LCSW, Care Coordinator at Deaconess Primary Care for Seniors

    Growing older is a privilege, but let’s face it—aging definitely brings about changes in our bodies and minds.

  • Shingles

    Dr. James Gutmann, Family Medicine Physician at Deaconess Clinic Mt. Pleasant

    In my 26 years of practicing family medicine, I have treated hundreds of patients with shingles and seen how painful and debilitating it can be. My goal in writing this article is to help people either learn how to potentially avoid shingles, OR help them know what to do if they get shingles. 

  • Single out Shingles: New Medical Advances for Combating Shingles

    Dr. James Gutman, Family Medicine Deaconess Clinic

    Chicken-pox are nearly a childhood rite of passage… Quarantine from others, being doused in calamine lotion and strong inclinations to take a hairbrush to those itchy miserable lesions.  The varicella virus (or chickenpox) primes patients to develop herpes zoster later on in life.

     

  • Who Decides, and When? - Understanding Advance Directives.

    Peggy Matacale, Chaplain, Deaconess Religious Life, and Candace Foster, Deaconess Privacy Officer

    Here at Deaconess, patients and family members are making decisions on others’ behalf every single day.  Sometimes the situation is sudden, such as after a car crash.  In other situations, a family member has been in a gradual decline. But in all circumstances it can be a difficult time, so having the right information, with the desired decision-makers, is very important.

  • 10 Choices to Add Years to Your Life

    Terry Gehlhausen, DO, Deaconess Clinic Family Medicine

    People who follow a few simple steps to improve their health have less cancer and heart disease compared to other Americans, and their overall death rate is significantly reduced compared to other people under age 65. Here are ten choices you can make that will lead to a longer and healthier life:

  • Your Diet and Your Hearing

    Ann B. Raibley, Certified Clinical Audiologist

    Protecting your ears from hazardous noise and keeping ear infections at bay are fundamental ways to minimize hearing loss. However, a healthy lifestyle with exercise and a balanced diet can also help maintain hearing health.

  • Alcohol and Seniors

    Dr. Errin Weisman,  Family Medicine

    When does drinking become a problem? The aging population is not immune to alcohol abuse.  For men and women 65 years of age or older, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse considers one drink per day to be the maximum amount for “moderate” alcohol use. 

  • Fall Prevention

    Kim Childers, MSW, LSW Care Coordinator at Deaconess Primary Care for Seniors

    Complications due to falls are the leading cause of death from injury in seniors age 65 and older. Prevention of falls in the home is so important. You’re protecting someone’s vitality, independence and life. 

  • Defining Arthritis

    Dr. Mujtaba Tapal, MD, Rheumatologist, Deaconess Clinic Downtown

    Arthritis is a very common condition, affecting as many as half of all Americans in their lifetime. In my more than 20 years of practice, I’ve seen thousands of patients who are suffering from arthritis. It can be a painful and debilitating disease. However, arthritis is a broad term that describes one of several conditions.

  • Shingles - Painful and Preventable. Patient & Physician Perspectives Part 1

    Shingles: A Patient’s Perspective – Part One

    Many people don’t know that about one in three people in the US will develop shingles during their lifetime, and older people are at the greatest risk for developing shingles. In fact, half of all people who live to age 85 will develop shingles at some point.
     

  • It's Raining Now! What do you do when someone you love is not doing as well as they used to.

    Content Provided by Deaconess VNA Plus Personal Care Services​

    Realizing that someone you love is not functioning as well at home as they used to can come as a shock; discovering what in-home care costs can be even more surprising, particularly since many people believe that Medicare or traditional health insurance will pay for all types of assistance.

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