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Cancer - Oncology Blog

  • Spread Fun, Not Flu

    Kathryn Ekstrom, MD, Pediatrics & Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Morganfield


    I don’t know about you, but I don’t have time to be sick with the flu.  A week or more of serious body aches, coughing, fever, etc. is not how I want to spend my time. Be prepared by getting your flu vaccine before flu season starts! 

  • Treating Cancer-Related Pain

    Laura Pauckner, FNP, Deaconess Comprehensive Pain Centers

    Unfortunately, cancer often causes pain, making an already difficult journey even worse. The good news, however, is pain that is caused by cancer can be treated. Once under control, patients experience a better quality of life.
     

  • Importance of a Health Care Representative

    Dr. Anna Dauer, Medical Director, Deaconess Palliative Care

    Here at Deaconess, people make decisions on others’ behalf every single day. Sometimes the situation is sudden, such as after a car crash. In other situations, a family member has been in a gradual decline. But in all circumstances it can be a difficult time, so having the right information, with the desired decision-makers, is crucial.

  • Schedule Online Now – Making Health Care More Convenient

    Amanda Bohleber, MD, Deaconess Clinic Medical Director
     
    It’s never been easier to schedule an appointment with a Deaconess doctor or service. Online scheduling is convenient, helps busy families and people on the go, and improves access to the care you need--when and where you need it.
     

  • Sexually Transmitted Infections: A Reality That Must Be Discussed

    Rebecca Hopper, MD, Pediatrics/Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Henderson

    About 20 million United States citizens get a sexually transmitted infection each year, with 15 to 24-year-olds accounting for half of all new STIs. Protecting yourself against sexually transmitted infections is important and should be achieved not through fear, but rather education.

  • The Facts about Endometriosis

    Daniel Griffin, MD, FACOG, Reproductive Endocrinologist, Boston IVF at The Women's Hospital

    Endometriosis is a common condition in which part of the uterine lining or glands are located outside of the uterus. Typically the glandular tissue is located in the pelvis and abdomen. The most common symptoms of endometriosis are painful menstrual cycles, pain with intercourse, infertility or an ovarian mass. Learn about the most common treatments for Endometriosis.

  • One Place for Breast Cancer Treatment

    Melody Littrell, Manager of Women’s Oncology & Breast Programs, The Women’s Hospital

    When a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer, she has many needs and concerns. One of the most important things she wants to know is that she’ll get the best care, beginning as quickly as possible. That’s why The Women’s Hospital and Deaconess Cancer Services decided to develop the Multidisciplinary Breast Cancer Clinic.
     

  • Gilda’s On The Go

    Melanie Atwood, Executive Director of Gilda’s Club of Evansville, part of Cancer Support Community

    An expanded relationship between Gilda’s Club and Deaconess Cancer Services will help cancer patients and their families receive important support services. Gilda’s on the Go will bring healthy lifestyle programs and activities directly to patients at the Chancellor Center for Oncology.
     

  • Managing the Pain of Shingles

    Sridhar Bhaskara, MD, Deaconess Comprehensive Pain Centers

    Shingles is a common, painful rash that will affect up to 1 in 5 people. Identifying and treating shingles quickly can prevent further pain and long-term complications.

  • What Is Palliative Care?

    Dr. Anna Dauer, Deaconess Palliative Care Medical Director, and Andrea Lantz, LCSW, Palliative Care Clinical Social Worker

    Perhaps you’ve heard the term “palliative care” but weren’t sure what it meant. Palliative care is specialized medical care for people with chronic illnesses, focusing on providing patients with relief from the symptoms, pain and stress of a chronic illness regardless of the diagnosis. The overall goal is to improve quality of life for both the patient and the family.
     

  • What All Women Should Know About Mammograms

    Marc Johnson, MD and Janine Morris, MD, Radiologists, Deaconess Breast Services

    Breast cancer will develop in 1 in 8 American women in her lifetime, so it’s very important that women be informed about options and recommendations for early detection.  
     

  • Making the Most of Your Doctor’s Appointment

    Ankita Bahuva, MD, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Downtown

    Your doctors’ appointments are an important and valuable time to connect with your doctor, share your perspective and information, and learn from your doctor’s expertise.  The best appointments happen when patients are very prepared.
     

  • Fighting Chronic Fatigue

    Ankita Bahuva, MD, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Downtown

    Chronic fatigue is a condition that causes someone to be extremely tired—to the point that they can’t function in their daily life.  It is also often misunderstood.
     

  • Emergency Preparedness for Patients with Health Problems

    Jim Hays, Deaconess Home Medical Equipment, and Tom Fite, R.Ph, Manager, Deaconess Family Pharmacy

    Recent national disasters have caused many people to give more thought to emergency preparedness.  As September is Emergency Preparedness Month, it’s a great time to be thinking about being disaster ready.
     

  • Which Cancer Screenings You Need, When, and WHY

    Mohammed Allaw, MD Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Gateway Professional Building

    Cancer screening recommendations can be confusing for many people--in my 20 years of practicing primary care medicine for adults, thousands of patients have had questions about various cancer screenings. 

    In this article, I’ll focus on breast, prostate, lung, colon and skin cancer screenings.

  • Health Screenings Men Need - When & Why

    Michael Luy, MD, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Downtown

    Health screenings help doctors and other providers detect conditions at earlier, more treatable stages.

  • Colon Screening Saves Lives – A Patient’s Perspective

    Grant Glackman, patient and Dr. Rubin Bahuva, Deaconess Clinic Gastroenterologist

    You’ve heard that colon cancer screening saves lives. In this article, a patient shares his story about how a routine colonoscopy may’ve saved his life at the age of 61. He and his doctor together explain what a colonoscopy is, and why it’s important.  

  • A Cancer Vaccine – Preventing Cervical and Head and Neck Cancers Through HPV Immunization

    Dr. Jacklyn Oakley, Faculty, Deaconess Family Medicine Residency

    HPV—the Human Papilloma virus—is a major topic of conversation across numerous aspects of the medical field.  Why?  There are several reasons.

  • Understanding Hospice

    Chanda Liebo, Director of Hospice Operations, and Kim Anderson, Inpatient Clinical Manager, Deaconess VNA Home Care & Hospice

    There are a many questions regarding hospice, such as, “What services are included?”, “How is it paid for?”, and more.  Below are answers to some of these most common questions, as well as additional information about why hospice is a wonderful service and resource for families when a loved one has a terminal condition. 

  • Screening for Lung Cancer Saves Lives

    Dr. Jugesh Cheema, Radiologist, Evansville Radiology
    Mariah Atkinson, BSN, RN, Deaconess Cancer Services Nurse Navigator


    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death, killing more Americans than breast, prostate and colon cancer combined. Fortunately, there is a screening tool available for those at risk for lung cancer, but many people don’t take advantage of this option.

  • The Survivorship Journey

    Claire Sutherby BSN, RN, CMSRN, Oncology Survivorship Nurse Navigator

    Earlier this month, Deaconess celebrated National Cancer Survivors Day with a special party for cancer survivors and their family and friends.   We celebrated because being a cancer survivor is a special thing!

  • Get Screened – It’s Simple and Could Save Your Life

    Dr. Devi Kodali, Deaconess Cancer Services
     
    March is Colon Cancer Awareness Month, so we are working to increase awareness about the importance of colon cancer screening. Did you know that only 4 in 10 cases of colon cancer are diagnosed at early stages?  

  • HPV and Cervical Cancer

    Kelli Dempsey, AOCNP, Oncology Certified Nurse Practitioner

    January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month. Cervical Cancer is primarily caused by HPV—this stands for Human Papilloma Virus.  Currently, in the United States alone, there are 80 million people infected with HPV. 14 million more become infected each year.

  • Preventing Cancer - Lifestyle Factors That Reduce Your Risk

    Dr. Devi Kodali, Deaconess Clinic Oncologist/Hematologist 

    The thought of cancer can be concerning. Learn what lifestyle factors play key roles in cancer development and what you can do to lower your overall cancer risk.

  • Preventing Cancer - 4 Specific Types

    Dr. Maqbool Ahmed, Deaconess Clinic Oncologist/Hematologist

    According to recent studies, it’s believed that up to 1/3 of cancers can be prevented through specific actions and lifestyle modifications. Learn what the four most preventable cancers are and what you can do to lower your risk.

  • Preparing For Your Cancer Journey

    Mary Gaffney, RN, Nurse Navigator, Deaconess Cancer Services

    Learning that you or someone you love has cancer is a life-changing moment. After hearing the word “cancer,” people are often overwhelmed, anxious and fearful.  You may feel paralyzed and numb, not knowing what to do next. There are many aspects to preparing for your cancer journey—medical, financial, physical, and emotional.  

  • Breast Cancer Resources for Tri-State Women

    Kathy Dockery, Director of the Deaconess Breast Center

    Kathy Dockery, Director of the Deaconess Breast Center and Sally Britt, Community Outreach Coordinator for Susan G. Komen for the Cure, Evansville/Tri-State affiliate talk about resources for women with breast cancer.

  • Cervical Cancer Screening and the HPV Vaccine

    Dr. Lauren Veazey, Family Practice Physician at Deaconess Clinic Mt. Pleasant.

    We’ve come a long way with cervical cancer.  Cervical cancer used to be the number one cancer killer of American women.  That number has gone down in recent years due to improved screening methods, but there are still improvements to be made.

  • Are You at Risk for Lung Cancer?

    Mary Gaffney, RN and Nurse Navigator at the Chancellor Center for Oncology​

    According to the American Cancer Society, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women. Each year, more people die of lung cancer than of colon, breast, and prostate cancers combined.  An annual test for lung cancer intended for long-term smokers (Low dose CT) is now offered by Deaconess Hospital and can help detect lung cancer at its earliest, most-treatable stages.

  • What You Need to Know About Colon Cancer

    Dr. Chris Braden, Deaconess Clinic Oncologist​

    More than 143,000 new colorectal (colon and rectum) cancer cases are diagnosed in the US each year, and 52,000 Americans die each year from the disease. Colon cancer is responsible for 9% of all cancer deaths, and it is the most commonly occurring cancer in both men and women after lung cancer according to the National Cancer Institute.
     

  • Men's Cancers & the Importance of Early Detection

    Dr. Joseph Klink, Deaconess Clinic Urology/Oncologist

    There are two cancers that are exclusive to men—prostate and testicular cancers.  Like all cancers, catching them early means the best chance of a good prognosis.
     

  • A Breast Cancer Story: From a Patient and Patient Navigator Perspective

    Patient – Leigh Ann
    Nurse Navigator – Robynn Working, Breast Patient


    In August 2012, I found a lump. I was only 42, so breast cancer wasn’t something I’d really thought about. I had no family history so I didn’t really worry about breast cancer, to be quite honest.

  • What Everyone Should Know About Skin Cancer

    According to the American Academy of Dermatology, it is estimated that one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. People of all races can develop skin cancer. However, certain people are more likely to develop skin cancer. Some skin cancer risk factors include:

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