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Safety Blog

  • Know Where to Go For Care

    Amanda Bohleber, MD, Medical Director, Deaconess Clinic

    A doctor—and mom—shares her tips for choosing the right care at the right time at the right place.

  • Emergency Preparedness for Patients with Health Problems

    Jim Hays, Deaconess Home Medical Equipment, and Tom Fite, R.Ph, Manager, Deaconess Family Pharmacy

    Recent national disasters have caused many people to give more thought to emergency preparedness.  As September is Emergency Preparedness Month, it’s a great time to be thinking about being disaster ready.
     

  • Be Motorcycle Aware!

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center

    Motorcyclists have all the same rights and privileges as any motor vehicle driver on the road. This means they are entitled to their space on the road, no matter the size of their ride. This also means that they must follow the same road laws as other vehicles, including keeping a safe distance from other vehicles. Remember to “share the road” with motorcyclists, and to be extra alert to help keep motorcyclists safe. 

  • Enjoying Fireworks Safely

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center

    Summer is synonymous with barbeques, parades and fireworks. But along with all of the celebrations come injuries from fireworks. While many of the injuries come from amateurs attempting to use professional grade, homemade, or illegal fireworks or explosives, about half of fireworks injuries come from legal, less powerful devices. Fireworks are also responsible for thousands of home and other structural fires each year. 

  • Fun and Safety with ATVs

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center

    The first week of June is ATV Safety Week. Sadly, 90% of all ATV-related fatalities could be prevented, as they are the result of behaviors that are warned about, such as children riding on adult-sized ATVs. 

  • National Water Safety Month

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center

    It’s summer, which means swimming and other water-related activities will fill the coming months, especially if you have children. Although playing in the water is fun, there are some inherent dangers. By following the tips below, you can have fun and remain safe at the same time. Simple steps save lives!

  • Stop The Bleed

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center

    Violence is the third leading cause of traumatic injury and death in our region. Natural disasters occur fairly routinely throughout the world. Accidents happen at home, school, and work. And sadly, in today’s society, we must also consider the possibility of a mass shooting event. 

  • Sports Injuries – Knowing How To Treat, When To Get Medical Care

    Daren Vertein, RN, FNP-BC, Deaconess Urgent Care and James Boulware, MA, ATC, LAT, Orthopaedic Associates Walk-In/Urgent Care

    Any sporting event, practice or training can lead to injuries.  Some injuries are minor, but others need urgent medical care. Below we discuss helpful information about how to handle a variety of common injuries resulting from nearly any sport.

  • Having a Happy—and Safe—Holiday Season

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center
     
    Christmas is the most wonderful time of the year for many people, but the decorations, special activities and gatherings can cause safety issues.   So many visits to the ED—during the holidays and otherwise--can be prevented by taking safety precautions. Also, injuries, fires and other disasters that happen around the holidays seem to be extra-challenging and sad for those involved.

  • Fall Prevention: Steps to Make Falls Less Likely

    Deaconess Regional Trauma Team

    Lack of exercise can lead to weak legs, which increases the chance of falling. Exercise programs can increase strength and improve balance, making falls less likely.
     

  • Be Smart and Buckle Up—Here’s Why

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center
     
    Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death among those aged 1-54. For adults and older children (who are big enough for seat belts to fit properly), seat belt use is the most effective way to save lives and reduce injuries in crashes. 

  • Gear Up For Safe Sports

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center
     
    Sports and recreational activities are an important part of a healthy, physically active lifestyle – for kids and adults alike. But more than 2.6 million people are treated in emergency departments throughout the US each year for sports and recreation-related injuries.

  • Understanding Sepsis

    Ruston Stoltz MD, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic
     
    Sepsis is a serious complication of an infection, and it can happen to anyone.  Young or old, sepsis can be life threatening, as between ¼ and ½ of all individuals who develop sepsis will die from it.

  • Don’t Be Bugged by Bugs

    Rebecca Hopper, MD Internal Medicine & Pediatrics, Deaconess Clinic
     
    Summer is a time when most of us head for the outdoors--even if it’s just our own backyard. The season provides a time to get more exercise, eat fresh produce, and perhaps most importantly lower our stress by enjoying nature.  

  • Walk On, and Walk Safety

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center

    Walking is one of the best things we can do to stay healthy, but only if we put safety first. We are seldom more vulnerable than when walking. It is important to pay attention to what is going on around us.

  • Skateboarding Safety Tips

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center

    Skateboarding is fun, and can be great for building strength, balance and stamina.  But without the right precautions, young people can get hurt.

  • Big Boo-Boos – How to Know When Your Child’s Injury Needs Medical Attention

    Dr. Taniza Karim, Pediatrician, Deaconess Clinic Boonville

    Bumps and bruises, bangs and scrapes are all part of being a child.  But as children play, sometimes more serious injuries can happen, and parents have to decide if a trip to the doctor, urgent care or emergency room is needed.

  • Staying Safe In Cold Weather

    Dr. Jung Smith, Family Medicine  Deaconess Clinic Mary Street
     
    Frostbite, hypothermia, overexertion and falls are the most common cold-weather health hazards. Below are important tips and information for staying safe this winter.
     

  • Protecting Your Family From Bug Bites

    Dr. Nancy Grauso-Eby, Pediatrician, Deaconess Clinic West
    Summer time means being outside.  And sometimes, that means that insects think that we’re delicious, and begin to bite.
     Fortunately, most bites by mosquitos, flies, fleas and even ticks do NOT cause disease. That being said, the best thing to do for your kids and yourself is to try to prevent the bite in the first place.

  • Lyme Disease

    Terry Gehlhausen, DO  Deaconess Clinic, Oakland City
    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness in the United States.  More than 100,000 cases have been reported since the disease was first discovered in 1982.  The disease is spread by the bite of a deer tick.

  • Top 20 Water Safety Tips for Children

    Dr. Taniza Karim, Deaconess Clinic Pediatrician 
    While enjoying the water is a memorable part of summer, water is one of the most ominous hazards your child will encounter. Young children can drown in only a few inches of water, even if they’ve had swimming instruction.  For youngsters in middle childhood, drowning ranks behind only motor-vehicle accidents as the leading cause of death.

  • Child Summer Safety Tips

    Dr. Taniza Karim, Deaconess Clinic Pediatrician 
    The summer months are a special time during childhood.  Outdoor activities, vacations, camps, etc. all lead to lifelong memories. Discover the top ways to keep your children safe this summer and what habits to encourage (and avoid) during this long break from school.

  • The Well-Stocked Medicine Cabinet

    Dr. Jung Smith, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic 
    I think it’s wise to have a stash of basic medications for everyone in the family, so I want to share information about various over-the-counter medications, to help you decide what you should have in YOUR well-stocked medicine cabinet.

  • Back to School for College Students

    University of Southern Indiana - University Health Center Staff

    Young adults heading to college—or back to college—have unique health needs such as diet, sleep, exercise, illnesses, stress, mental health and immunizations/testing. 

  • 4 Steps to Safe Backpack Use

    Whether it’s back to school time for your child, or you’re planning a long hike, check out these helpful tips to ensure you know how to safely wear a backpack and promote good posture and spinal health. 

  • Concussion Questions & Answers

    Gina Niemeier, PA-C, of the Deaconess Concussion Clinic ​

    The Deaconess Concussion Clinic specializes in the assessment and treatment of concussions.  Through this blog post, I’ll explain what a concussion is, how to tell if you or someone you love has one, what should be done if you have a concussion and some prevention tips.

  • Sun Safety for Kids

    Summer is a great time for children to be healthy and active outdoors! However, with the sunny weather comes the risk of sun dangers. Follow these sun safety tips to ensure that you and your kiddos have a fun and safe summer!
     

  • Be Smart About Medications...Especially Around Kids

    Tom Fite, RPh and Manager of the Deaconess Family Pharmacy

    Did you know that medications are the leading cause of child poisoning?  Each year, thousands of children are rushed to emergency rooms due to being accidentally poisoned by medications.
     
    Children are naturally curious about the world around them, so as their caregivers, we must be vigilant about keeping them safe.  People underestimate how clever children can be and how dangerous medication can be for little ones.

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