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Diabetes Blog

  • Chronic Kidney Disease

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is very common—affecting about 14 percent of the US adult population. It’s closely related to diabetes and high blood pressure, and can cause serious complications.

  • Managing the Pain of Shingles

    Sridhar Bhaskara, MD, Deaconess Comprehensive Pain Centers

    Shingles is a common, painful rash that will affect up to 1 in 5 people. Identifying and treating shingles quickly can prevent further pain and long-term complications.

  • What Is Palliative Care?

    Dr. Anna Dauer, Deaconess Palliative Care Medical Director, and Andrea Lantz, LCSW, Palliative Care Clinical Social Worker

    Perhaps you’ve heard the term “palliative care” but weren’t sure what it meant. Palliative care is specialized medical care for people with chronic illnesses, focusing on providing patients with relief from the symptoms, pain and stress of a chronic illness regardless of the diagnosis. The overall goal is to improve quality of life for both the patient and the family.
     

  • Heartburn or GERD?

    When is heartburn more than just heartburn? The quick answer is when the heartburn happens two or more times per week over several weeks, your taco dinner with hot sauce isn’t to blame and it may be time to talk to your doctor about GERD.
     

  • Know Where to Go For Care

    Amanda Bohleber, MD, Medical Director, Deaconess Clinic

    A doctor—and mom—shares her tips for choosing the right care at the right time at the right place.

  • Making the Most of Your Doctor’s Appointment

    Ankita Bahuva, MD, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Downtown

    Your doctors’ appointments are an important and valuable time to connect with your doctor, share your perspective and information, and learn from your doctor’s expertise.  The best appointments happen when patients are very prepared.
     

  • Fighting Chronic Fatigue

    Ankita Bahuva, MD, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Downtown

    Chronic fatigue is a condition that causes someone to be extremely tired—to the point that they can’t function in their daily life.  It is also often misunderstood.
     

  • Emergency Preparedness for Patients with Health Problems

    Jim Hays, Deaconess Home Medical Equipment, and Tom Fite, R.Ph, Manager, Deaconess Family Pharmacy

    Recent national disasters have caused many people to give more thought to emergency preparedness.  As September is Emergency Preparedness Month, it’s a great time to be thinking about being disaster ready.
     

  • Health Screenings Men Need - When & Why

    Michael Luy, MD, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Downtown

    Health screenings help doctors and other providers detect conditions at earlier, more treatable stages.

  • Type II Diabetes: Managing Your Options

    Mark Graves, MD, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic 

    According to the Centers for Disease Control, over 29 million Americans have diabetes and of those 29 million, one in four people do not know they have diabetes.
     

  • A Doctor’s Perspective on Managing Type II Diabetes—for Herself and Her Patients

    Dr. Leslie Strouse, Internal Medicine 
      
    Type II diabetes is an increasingly-common condition here in the Tri-State, with as many as 1 in 9 older adults having the disease. I have been managing my own diabetes for more than a decade now. So as both a physician and patient with the condition, I have a unique perspective on what it means to manage diabetes.

  • Diabetes: Let's Get Serious

    Dr. Errin Weisman, Deaconess Clinic Family Medicine 
    What disease can rob you of your vision, freeze up your GI tract, steal your sense of touch, obliterate your kidneys and wreak havoc on your blood vessels causing strokes or heart attacks? DIABETES

  • Diabetes 101

    Jane Hackert, Certified Diabetes Educator, Deaconess Diabetes Center​

    Diabetes is a serious condition that is becoming more and more common. Diabetes, which is marked by elevated blood glucose and the body’s inability to use that blood glucose, affects more than 25.8 million people in the U.S., about 8.3% of the population.

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