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    Diabetes Alert Day: Healthy Plate

    Angela Zirkelbach, RD Diabetes Educator 03/17/2020
    American Diabetes Association Diabetes Alert Day is on March 24, 2020. This day focuses on ‘alerting’ everyone about the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and the importance of understanding your risk.  The sooner you know you’re at risk, the sooner you can take steps to prevent or manage diabetes. 

    An important step you can take to prevent and manage diabetes is to monitor your diet. 
     
    Monitoring your diet does not mean you have to give up all the foods you love! The occasional scoop of ice cream or baked potato are not necessarily off limits. You can still enjoy them, but both of these foods contain carbohydrates so they will affect your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, you will need to keep track of how many carbs you consume -much like a budget!
     
    If carbohydrate counting seems overwhelming, try starting with the healthy plate. Use a 9-inch plate; fill half of it with non-starchy vegetables, one quarter with protein, one quarter with starch, and add a serving of fruit or dairy on the side.
     
    Here is an example of a healthy plate meal: Breakfast
     
    • Protein: one sunny side up egg with a turkey sausage patty
    • Starch: one slice of toast
    • Non starchy vegetables: slices of bell pepper and onion
    • Fruit: one orange
    • Dairy: one glass of milk
     
    This meal provides 45 grams of carbs. If you do not know how many carbohydrates to consume at each meal, a good starting point is 45 grams for women and 60 grams for men.

    A healthy plate equals healthy blood sugars, so get your “Game Plate On” and start practicing a healthier diet without all the fuss!

    Please note: If you are insulin dependent, you will want to use a more advanced form of carb counting. The specialists at the Deaconess Diabetes Center can help you understand carbs and how they affect your blood sugars, plus help you develop simple ways to manage both. 
     
    For additional information, call the Deaconess Diabetes Center at 812-426-9895 or visit deaconess.com/diabetes. Our educators specialize in helping you make simple modifications to your daily life that can make huge positive impact on your diabetes management.
     
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