Skip to main content Skip to home page

Deaconess MyChart

Access Deaconess MyChart

Access Deaconess MyChart

Sign In
New User? Sign up now
Download For Your Mobile Device
  • Android
  • Apple

Dermatology & Skin Blog

  • Managing Dry Winter Skin

    Jamie Mull, MD, Deaconess Clinic Dermatology

    The arrival of winter usually signals the arrival of dry skin. Anyone can develop dry skin, but the cold climate of the winter months, accompanied by the dry heat indoors, can aggravate the condition.

  • Advanced Treatments for Atopic Dermatitis

    Clay Davis, MD, Deaconess Clinic Dermatology

    Atopic dermatitis, or eczema, is often a chronic skin condition that can have a significant impact on quality of life.   

  • Love the Skin You’re In: Ways to Combat Psoriasis

    Clay Davis, MD, Deaconess Clinic Dermatology

    Psoriasis isn’t just an annoying skin condition – it can be a lifelong issue that requires constant management, supervision and treatment. 

  • Schedule Online Now – Making Health Care More Convenient

    Amanda Bohleber, MD, Deaconess Clinic Medical Director
     
    It’s never been easier to schedule an appointment with a Deaconess doctor or service. Online scheduling is convenient, helps busy families and people on the go, and improves access to the care you need--when and where you need it.
     

  • Making the Most of Your Doctor’s Appointment

    Ankita Bahuva, MD, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Downtown

    Your doctors’ appointments are an important and valuable time to connect with your doctor, share your perspective and information, and learn from your doctor’s expertise.  The best appointments happen when patients are very prepared.
     

  • Which Cancer Screenings You Need, When, and WHY

    Mohammed Allaw, MD Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Gateway Professional Building

    Cancer screening recommendations can be confusing for many people--in my 20 years of practicing primary care medicine for adults, thousands of patients have had questions about various cancer screenings. 

    In this article, I’ll focus on breast, prostate, lung, colon and skin cancer screenings.

  • Atopic Dermatitis: The Itch for New Treatments

    J. Clay Davis, MD, Deaconess Clinic Dermatology

    Uncontrollable itching. Cracked, scaly, or dry skin. Small raised bumps that ooze when scratched. If your child suffers from any of these symptoms, they might have a severe form of eczema known as atopic dermatitis. Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic skin condition that can occur in people of any age; however, it most commonly begins in childhood and improves as people approach adulthood.
     

  • Understanding Psoriasis

    Celine Mestel, MD, PhD, Deaconess Clinic Dermatology

    Psoriasis is a common chronic skin condition that affects about 1-2% of the population, and is one of the most common diseases that dermatologists treat.

  • Don’t Be Bugged by Bugs

    Rebecca Hopper, MD Internal Medicine & Pediatrics, Deaconess Clinic
     
    Summer is a time when most of us head for the outdoors--even if it’s just our own backyard. The season provides a time to get more exercise, eat fresh produce, and perhaps most importantly lower our stress by enjoying nature.  

  • Addressing Acne: New Strategies for an Age-Old Problem

    Michelle Galen, MD Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic 

    Pimples and blemishes can be a stubborn problem, even past the teenage years. Learn more about treatment options.
     

  • Protecting Your Family From Bug Bites

    Dr. Nancy Grauso-Eby, Pediatrician, Deaconess Clinic West

    Summer time means being outside.  And sometimes, that means that insects think that we’re delicious, and begin to bite.
     Fortunately, most bites by mosquitos, flies, fleas and even ticks do NOT cause disease. That being said, the best thing to do for your kids and yourself is to try to prevent the bite in the first place.

  • Love the Skin You’re In: Four Ways to Combat Psoriasis

    Clay Davis, MD Dermatologist, Deaconess Clinic 

    Psoriasis isn’t just an annoying skin condition – it can be a lifelong issue that requires constant management, supervision and treatment.  Psoriasis sufferers experience an accelerated skin cell cycle resulting in scaly patches that are typically dry, itchy and painful.  Psoriasis can affect the nails, scalp and areas with sensitive skin like the underarms.  

  • Lyme Disease

    Terry Gehlhausen, DO, Deaconess Clinic, Oakland City

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness in the United States.  More than 100,000 cases have been reported since the disease was first discovered in 1982.  The disease is spread by the bite of a deer tick.

  • Heave Those Hives: Five Ways to Combat the Itch

    Majed Koleilat, MD  Allergy/Immunology, Pediatric Allergy/Immunology

    Those tingling red swollen bumps that you may mistake for mosquito bites might just be urticaria (hives). Characterized by sudden itchy red bumps that change shape and turn white if pressed (called blanching), hives are uncomfortable, annoying and troublesome.    

  • Ditch the Itch! New Treatments for Eczema

    Clay Davis, MD, Dermatology Deaconess Clinic

    Atopic dermatitis, or eczema, is often a chronic skin condition that can have a significant impact on quality of life.  The condition is characterized by an itchy pink, dry rash that often leads to cycles of itching and scratching that are hard to break. 

  • Shingles - Painful and Preventable. Patient & Physician Perspectives Part 1

    Shingles: A Patient’s Perspective – Part One

    Many people don’t know that about one in three people in the US will develop shingles during their lifetime, and older people are at the greatest risk for developing shingles. In fact, half of all people who live to age 85 will develop shingles at some point.
     

  • What Everyone Should Know About Skin Cancer

    According to the American Academy of Dermatology, it is estimated that one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. People of all races can develop skin cancer. However, certain people are more likely to develop skin cancer. Some skin cancer risk factors include:

Top Back to top