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Bone & Joint Blog

  • Conservative Treatments for Joint Pain

    Rhiannon Anderson, PA, Orthopaedic Associates

    Experiencing joint pain? Surgery is not your only option. There are many conservative (non-surgical) options that can provide significant relief from joint pain.

  • Making the Most of Your Doctor’s Appointment

    Ankita Bahuva, MD, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Downtown

    Your doctors’ appointments are an important and valuable time to connect with your doctor, share your perspective and information, and learn from your doctor’s expertise.  The best appointments happen when patients are very prepared.
     

  • Fighting Chronic Fatigue

    Ankita Bahuva, MD, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Downtown

    Chronic fatigue is a condition that causes someone to be extremely tired—to the point that they can’t function in their daily life.  It is also often misunderstood.
     

  • Treating Joint Pain - What To Do and When to See a Doctor

    Jared Kiernicki, PA, Orthopaedic Associates

    If you’re experiencing pain in any joint—your knee, ankle, shoulder, hip, etc.—you need to know how to best treat it at home. It’s also important to know when it’s time to see a doctor.
     
     

  • Preventing & Treating Osteoporosis

    Dr. Darla Grossman, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic West

    Osteoporosis, a condition in which bones become weak and brittle, is a common condition that can have serious consequences—including premature death from complications of broken bones.

  • Joint Replacement FAQs

    Brooke Kline, PA-C, Orthopaedic Associates 
     
    When someone is considering joint replacement, many questions come to mind about what to expect from the overall process—before surgery, during the hospital stay, and afterwards. 

  • Fall Prevention: Steps to Make Falls Less Likely

    Deaconess Regional Trauma Team

    Lack of exercise can lead to weak legs, which increases the chance of falling. Exercise programs can increase strength and improve balance, making falls less likely.
     

  • Women And Bone Health

    Kim Snyder, PT, Clinic Director, High Pointe Therapy at The Women's Hospital

    Women seem to be very conscientious about getting routine exams completed.  Whether it is a mammogram, yearly physical, and colonoscopy or bone density.  When getting the results we are relieved when everything is negative or normal.

  • In the Know About Knee Pain

    Dr. Daniel Emerson, Orthopaedic Associates, Deaconess Joint Replacement Program

    If you suffer from knee pain, you’re not alone.  Out of approximately 320 million people living in the United States, more than 40 million suffer some form of arthritis.

  • Knee Osteoarthritis: Living Pain-Free

    Michelle Galen, MD, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic
     
    Our knees do a lot of “heavy lifting” so it’s not surprising that nearly 50% of adults will develop osteoarthritis in the knee by the age of 85.  The human knee consists of three bones (kneecap, tibia and femur) that must move in concert to allow normal range of motion.  The ends of all three bones are covered in cartilage to cushion the joint during movement.  With aging and “wear-and-tear,” the cartilage starts to wear away and the result is painful bone-on-bone friction and/or bone spurs. 

  • Weekend Warrior to Total Knee

    Dr. Gary Moore, MD, Sports Medicine, Total Joint Replacement, General Orthopaedics

    The normal human knee will tolerate the stresses of life – walking, lifting, running, sports, even extreme sports without wearing out enough to ever require a total joint; but, not every knee is normal.  There are many circumstances that cause a knee to wear out and get osteoarthritis.  Plus, the life expectancy in the year 1900 was about 50 – now it is in to the late 80’s; so, we have over 30 extra years to get osteoarthritis.

  • Clearing Up the Question about Hip Fractures: When to Replace, When to Fix.

    Dr. Dennis Beck, Jr., MD, Trauma, Total Joint Replacement, General Orthopaedics

    Hip fractures in the United States represent an epidemic of disease.  As of 2003, there were 2.25 million hip fractures in the world.  Hip fractures are increasing at a rate of approximately 8% every year due to the population aging and increased activity of our seniors and the community.

  • A Doctor's Take on Osteoporosis

    Dr. Becca Hopper, Deaconess Clinic Internist and Pediatrician

    Osteoporosis is a disease in which the density and quality of bone are reduced—bones actually become weaker. As bones become more porous and fragile, the risk of fracture is greatly increased. The loss of bone occurs silently and progressively. Often there are no symptoms until the first fracture occurs.

  • Joint Replacement Q & A - What to Expect

    When someone is considering joint replacement, many questions come to mind about what to expect from the overall process—before surgery, during the hospital stay, and afterwards. Each year, Deaconess performs more than 800 joint replacement surgeries. The majority of those are hip and knee replacements, but we also offer shoulder replacements as well. Because joint issues are so common, lots of people have probably had the same questions you do.

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