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Children's Health & Parenting Blog

  • Common Winter Illnesses In Children

    Mallory Williams Zorn, MD, Deaconess Clinic Pediatrics

    It’s “sick season”— kids everywhere are sharing germs with children at school, daycare and other activities. I want to share helpful information about common winter illnesses so caregivers know what to do, and how to help their child feel better.
     

  • Safe Sleep

    Mary Stephens, RN, Director of Newborn Services at The Women's Hospital

    Learning about SUIDS (Sudden Unexpected Infant Death Syndrome) and safe sleep for babies is important for all caregivers, not just for parents. SUIDS is the leading cause of death among babies between 1 month and 1 year of age. It is important for parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, babysitters, childcare providers, and anyone else who might care for babies to learn more.

  • Setting Social Media Boundaries for Kids and Teens

    Deaconess Cross Pointe Outpatient Services 

    As a parent, setting healthy social media boundaries for your children can make a significant difference in their emotional health, school performance, development and more.  

  • Homemade Baby Food Done Right

    Jennifer D., RD Dietetics and Nutrition Manager at The Women's Hospital

    When your baby’s doctor says it is time to introduce new baby foods, you may consider whether you will feed your baby store bought fruits and veggies from the jars as most of you probably were, or if you will try making homemade baby food. With homemade baby food, you can ensure that you know exactly what is going into your baby’s body. But, there are proper steps you should take to make sure the food they are eating is safe!

  • Spread Fun, Not Flu

    Kathryn Ekstrom, MD, Pediatrics & Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Morganfield


    I don’t know about you, but I don’t have time to be sick with the flu.  A week or more of serious body aches, coughing, fever, etc. is not how I want to spend my time. Be prepared by getting your flu vaccine before flu season starts! 

  • Getting More Fruit Into Your Diet

    Emily Fortner, Clinical Dietitian, Deaconess Weight Loss Solutions

    One of the best parts of summer are the seasonal, delicious fruits. Early summer gives us sweet strawberries; later we get to enjoy plump grapes, vibrant berries, juicy peaches...the list goes on and on! 

  • Quick & Healthy Breakfast Ideas for Your Family

    Carolyn Burns, RD, Deaconess Weight Loss Solutions

    Now that children are back in school, morning time can be very hectic. Amid the busy routine of getting everyone up, ready, and off to school, it is easy to skip breakfast. But as you’ve probably heard, breakfast is the most important meal of the day.   
     

  • What is GBS and What Does it Mean for Me and My Baby?

    What are Group B streptococci (GBS)?  What is Group B streptococci infection? 

  • Adult Vaccines

    Rebekah Basham, PA, Deaconess Clinic Mary Street

    Most people are aware pediatric vaccinations are very important and prevent serious diseases and related complications. However, people often forget there are adult vaccinations and boosters that are recommended to keep us healthy and prevent complications associated with certain infections. 

  • What to Expect Your First Night Home

    Being home with your baby for the very first time can be both exciting and unnerving. You have left the protective cocoon of the hospital. I had a huge stack of discharge paperwork and a fond farewell from the nurses and staff. I thought to myself…I am expected to know how to do all of this and take care of a baby!?! The answer is yes. 

  • School Physicals and Getting Back to School Routine

    Dr. Kusum Pradhan, MD, FAAP

    The start of new school year is just around the corner. Does your child need a physical or immunizations?  Have you thought about how to get back into a routine, or how to address "first day jitters"? This article can help.

  • Schedule Online Now – Making Health Care More Convenient

    Amanda Bohleber, MD, Deaconess Clinic Medical Director
     
    It’s never been easier to schedule an appointment with a Deaconess doctor or service. Online scheduling is convenient, helps busy families and people on the go, and improves access to the care you need--when and where you need it.
     

  • Summer Accidents and Injuries to Avoid

    Summer is in full swing - sunshine, fireworks, backyard barbecues, campfires and dehydration! Follow our helpful tips so these five summer-related (and totally preventable) accidents and injuries don’t ruin your fun in the sun. 


     

  • Find a Class for Everyone in your Growing Family

    Christy H., RN, BSN, Maternal Care Educator at The Women's Hospital

    The Women’s Hospital has classes for everyone, whether you’re expecting your first child or just need a refresher on certain skills. All of our classes are taught by experienced professionals in their area of expertise. Therefore, you are sure to receive the most up-to-date, accurate information on the topics you are most interested in.
     

  • 8 Healthy & Fit Summer Vacation Tips

    Helen Schnarr, Clinical Dietitian, Deaconess 

    Vacation is a great time to reduce stress and rejuvenate your mind, body and spirit. It’s not, however, the time to turn back on healthy lifestyle changes you worked on through the winter and spring months. Here are a few ways to maintain healthy habits when you’re out of town and out of your normal routine.
     

  • Why is it Important to Know My Family Medical History

    Christine H., Genetic Counselor at Tri State Perinatology

    Knowing one’s family medical history allows a person to take steps to reduce his or her risk. You should address any concerns you have about your family history with your physician or another qualified healthcare professional such as a genetics counselor.

  • Flat Head Syndrome

    Lorien A., MPT, OCS

    Positional Plagiocephaly (Flat Head Syndrome) - How do we help and prevent it?

  • How to Prevent Summer Brain Drain

    Kusum Pradhan, MD, FAAP, Board Certified Pediatrician-Deaconess Clinic

    The end of school often brings the end of structured academic activities – at least during summer break.  Learn how to keep your child's mind and body active through these next months, so they're ready to return to a productive school year.
     

  • Moms Support Circle

    Rachel Beier, BSN, RNC-OB, Maternal Care Advisor at The Women's Hospital

    Due to hormone changes after pregnancy, it is common to experience feelings of anxiety, sadness, or overwhelmed. The Women’s Hospital would like to assist you in your recovery with Mom’s Support Circle, our free, self-help group.

  • An Infertility Story: Journey to Baby Topper

    Valerie Topper, CNM, Boston IVF at The Women's Hospital

    70 pills, 46 shots, 112 vaginal suppositories, numerous vaginal ultrasounds, and 2 years and 4 month’s time…


     

  • Sexually Transmitted Infections: A Reality That Must Be Discussed

    Rebecca Hopper, MD, Pediatrics/Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Henderson

    About 20 million United States citizens get a sexually transmitted infection each year, with 15 to 24-year-olds accounting for half of all new STIs. Protecting yourself against sexually transmitted infections is important and should be achieved not through fear, but rather education.

  • Knowing When to Take Your New Baby to the Doctor

    Kusum Pradhan, MD, Deaconess Clinic Pediatrician

    Bringing a new baby home is exciting and sometimes stressful. You want to do what’s best for your baby but how are you supposed to know what that is? What’s normal and what’s an emergency? Get tips from a pediatrician and a mom.
     

  • Online Parenting Resources

    Kusum Pradhan, MD, Deaconess Clinic Pediatrics

    Don’t believe everything you read on the internet, especially when it comes to children's health information and parenting advice. That’s what I tell my patients and their parents.
     

  • Women and Heart Disease: Pregnancy Induced Heart Failure

    Courtney Hoppenjans,OB and Heart Patient, Deaconess Health System

    Courtney Hoppenjans, OB and Heart patient, shares her 2014 story about pregnancy induced heart failure. Learn about why women should listen to their bodies and how the amazing teams from The Heart Hospital and The Women's Hospital helped save Courtney and her baby's life.
     

  • Dear New Mom, Don't Forget About YOU

    Constantine Scordalakes, MD, Women's Health Care P.C.

    The postpartum period—the days and weeks after giving birth--involves many emotional and physical changes for you as a new mother.  It also involves learning how to care for your newborn and how to function with the new demands at home. Adequate rest, good nutrition, and support from family and friends are crucial during the first few weeks after delivery to allow you to rebuild your strength.


     

  • 10 Baby Necessities: What Are They?

    Jenna Andrews, Community Engagement, and Experienced Mom

    You are in Babies R Us. Your husband has the scanner gun because, let’s be honest, the only way you could get him to join you was by promising he could play with the scanner gun. The haunting memory of registering for your wedding gifts 9 months prior is coming back. You are overwhelmed. You have never had a baby before! How are you supposed to know what you need?!

  • Choosing Toys for Young Children

    Teresa Martelli, MD, Deaconess Clinic Gateway Pediatrics

    Choosing toys for a young child this holiday season?  Learn more about open ended toys, and why they’re important for developing minds.
     

  • Know Where to Go For Care

    Amanda Bohleber, MD, Medical Director, Deaconess Clinic

    A doctor—and mom—shares her tips for choosing the right care at the right time at the right place.

  • Making the Most of Your Doctor’s Appointment

    Ankita Bahuva, MD, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Downtown

    Your doctors’ appointments are an important and valuable time to connect with your doctor, share your perspective and information, and learn from your doctor’s expertise.  The best appointments happen when patients are very prepared.
     

  • Keeping Your Baby Safe

    Capri Weyer, MD, Deaconess Clinic Gateway Pediatrics

    Baby safety is important for all new parents, but it doesn’t just stop there. Who else should stay up-to-date on the topic of keeping babies safe? Grandparents, older siblings, aunts, uncles and any other caregiver who may babysit or have a baby at their house can all benefit from these tips.

  • Emergency Preparedness for Patients with Health Problems

    Jim Hays, Deaconess Home Medical Equipment, and Tom Fite, R.Ph, Manager, Deaconess Family Pharmacy

    Recent national disasters have caused many people to give more thought to emergency preparedness.  As September is Emergency Preparedness Month, it’s a great time to be thinking about being disaster ready.
     

  • Atopic Dermatitis: The Itch for New Treatments

    J. Clay Davis, MD, Deaconess Clinic Dermatology

    Uncontrollable itching. Cracked, scaly, or dry skin. Small raised bumps that ooze when scratched. If your child suffers from any of these symptoms, they might have a severe form of eczema known as atopic dermatitis. Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic skin condition that can occur in people of any age; however, it most commonly begins in childhood and improves as people approach adulthood.
     

  • Keeping Kids Busy and Active During the Summer

    Deaconess Editorial Staff
     
    School is out, the weather is warm, and you need to keep the kids busy. Hours on the couch watching TV or playing video games isn’t something that will keep their bodies healthy.

  • National Water Safety Month

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center

    It’s summer, which means swimming and other water-related activities will fill the coming months, especially if you have children. Although playing in the water is fun, there are some inherent dangers. By following the tips below, you can have fun and remain safe at the same time. Simple steps save lives!

  • How Dads Can Help After Baby Arrives

    Rachel Beier, RNC-OB, Maternal Care Advisor at The Women's Hospital
     
    Being a part of your newborn’s life from the beginning is very important. Dad’s involvement promotes family bonding, increases the longevity and security of the new family, and decreases stress.  Dads can help ease the transition of adding a new baby to the family in the following ways.
     

  • Helping Children Who Are Hurting - Understanding ACEs: Adverse Childhood Experiences

    Janie Chappell, Manager of Community Services at Deaconess Cross Pointe, and Susan Phelps, Director of Neuroeducation, Evansville-Vanderburgh School Corporation
     
    Some of the most significant predictors of adolescent and adult substance abuse, mental illness, learning difficulties and other serious social problems are ACEs—Adverse Childhood Experiences.  

  • Baby Blues

    Sarah Kluender, LSW, Wellness and Counseling Services at The Women's Hospital

    You've been preparing for the last several months for the arrival of your new baby.  The nursery is ready.  You have everything you will need in order to care for the new baby.  Delivery went well and you and baby have returned home from the hospital, but something just doesn’t seem right.
     

  • Big Brother, Big Sister

    Rachel Beier, BSN, RNC, Maternal Care Advisor at The Women’s Hospital

    With the addition of a baby, will there also be a new big brother or big sister in your house? Have you thought about the effect a new baby will have on your children? 

  • Are Your Finances 'Baby Ready'?

    Rachel Beier, BSN, RNC, Maternal Care Advisor at The Women's Hospital
     
    Your family is about to grow in size, and with that growth comes added costs.  Some parents may wonder how they are going to manage their day-to-day expenses while still pursuing their family’s long term aspirations.  Are you prepared financially for your baby’s birth? 

  • How To Talk To Your Kids About Sex

    Jason Hays, LCSW and Beth Petersen, PsyD, Deaconess Clinic Behavioral Health

    This blog is about the talk that no one wants to have: The Talk…the talk with your kids about sex, where babies come from, etc.

    But one of the first points we want to make is that this shouldn’t just be one talk—to really help your kids understand sexuality, and make good choices, there should be open communication over many years, and many discussions should be had.
     

  • How To Talk To Your Teenager About Sex

    Jason Hays, LCSW, Deaconess Clinic Behavioral Health

    Many parents find it difficult to talk with their children about sex—they don’t want to say the wrong things, or have to think back about decisions they made as teenagers.  Teens may also be embarrassed, not trust their parent's advice, or prefer not to talk with their parents about it. But sex is an important topic to talk about.

  • Common ENT Problems in Kids

    Dr. David Wahle, Deaconess Clinic ENT physician  

    Issues with ear, nose and throat health seem to be a part of childhood. I’ve been a practicing otolaryngologist/head and neck surgeon for more than 20 years here in Evansville.  In that time I’ve treated thousands of children who have had problems with their ears, nose and throat that required surgery.

  • The Baby is Here! Now What?

    Karla Kitch, MD, Deaconess Pediatric Hospitalist

    You’ve carefully followed your obstetrician’s instructions, and delivered a healthy baby… but now the BIG questions start to pop up. Usually these questions come to mind when it’s least convenient to you and often after your pediatrician’s office has closed for the day.  Here are some things to consider for these first few sweet but exhausting weeks!  

  • A Cancer Vaccine – Preventing Cervical and Head and Neck Cancers Through HPV Immunization

    Dr. Jacklyn Oakley, Faculty, Deaconess Family Medicine Residency

    HPV—the Human Papilloma virus—is a major topic of conversation across numerous aspects of the medical field.  Why?  There are several reasons.

  • Kids and Stress

    Dr. Pamela Rogers, MD Pediatrics Deaconess Clinic 

    Kids and stress. Growing up can be hard sometimes, and back-to-school is a time of change, growth and yes, stress.  

  • Understanding Hand, Foot & Mouth Disease

    Capri Weyer, MD Pediatrics Deaconess Clinic 

    Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is a viral infection most commonly caused by coxsackievirus.  Although it can be seen in any age group, it is usually seen in young children. “Outbreaks” are also common in late summer and early fall—August into October.
     

  • Healthy Snack Ideas for Kids

    Deaconess MyHealth Editorial staff

    Trying to think of some new ideas for healthy snacks for kids?  We’ve done the looking for you! Below are some cute, creative and nutritious snack ideas for kids of all ages.
     

  • Gear Up For Safe Sports

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center
     
    Sports and recreational activities are an important part of a healthy, physically active lifestyle – for kids and adults alike. But more than 2.6 million people are treated in emergency departments throughout the US each year for sports and recreation-related injuries.

  • Don’t Be Bugged by Bugs

    Rebecca Hopper, MD Internal Medicine & Pediatrics, Deaconess Clinic
     
    Summer is a time when most of us head for the outdoors--even if it’s just our own backyard. The season provides a time to get more exercise, eat fresh produce, and perhaps most importantly lower our stress by enjoying nature.  

  • Alternative Treatments for Autism

    Michelle Galen, MD Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic
     
    Autism spectrum disorder is a developmental disorder that affects the brain. It can be characterized by social interaction difficulty, behavioral differences and communication challenges.

  • Skateboarding Safety Tips

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center

    Skateboarding is fun, and can be great for building strength, balance and stamina.  But without the right precautions, young people can get hurt.

  • Fussy Baby? May Be The Formula

    Wm. Michael Crecelius, MD Pediatrics, Deaconess Clinic  

    New parents are familiar with getting little sleep, middle-of-the-night feedings and round-the-clock supervision of infants.  The term “fussy” is often used with babies who experience gastrointestinal distress, bloating, spitting up, constipation or diarrhea after eating.  

  • Keeping Kids Busy and Active During the Summer

    By Deaconess MyHealth editorial staff
     
    School is out, the weather is warm, and you need to keep the kids busy.  Hours on the couch watching TV or playing video games isn’t something that will keep their bodies healthy.
    Here are some suggestions on local ideas that will keep the kiddos busy and moving:

  • Autism: Knowing the Signs and the Importance of Early Intervention

    Sara Dillon, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner, Certified Pediatric Primary Care Mental Health Specialist, Deaconess Riley Children’s Services

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a lifelong developmental disability.  Many people don’t understand autism and the importance of recognizing signs and symptoms in young children so they can get the early help they need.   

  • Helping Kids Develop Healthy Eating Habits

    Taniza Karim, MD Pediatrician, Deaconess Clinic Boonville

    Every day we learn more about the importance of nutrition in the health of children, both now and as they become adults.
     

  • Big Boo-Boos – How to Know When Your Child’s Injury Needs Medical Attention

    Dr. Taniza Karim, Pediatrician, Deaconess Clinic Boonville

    Bumps and bruises, bangs and scrapes are all part of being a child.  But as children play, sometimes more serious injuries can happen, and parents have to decide if a trip to the doctor, urgent care or emergency room is needed.

  • Cold or Flu - What To Do?

    Dr. Carla Essling, Family Medicine Physician, Deaconess Clinic Gateway Professional Building  

    Cold symptoms are usually milder in nature than those of the flu—but can make you pretty miserable. Cold symptoms also start more gradually than flu symptoms. 

  • All About Head Lice

    Dr. Nancy Grauso-Eby, Deaconess Clinic Pediatrician

    Anyone can get head lice.  Head lice are most common in preschool- and elementary school-aged children. It doesn’t matter how clean your home or hair may be.  It doesn’t matter where children and families live, play and work. 

  • Protecting Your Family From Bug Bites

    Dr. Nancy Grauso-Eby, Pediatrician, Deaconess Clinic West

    Summer time means being outside.  And sometimes, that means that insects think that we’re delicious, and begin to bite.
     Fortunately, most bites by mosquitos, flies, fleas and even ticks do NOT cause disease. That being said, the best thing to do for your kids and yourself is to try to prevent the bite in the first place.

  • Lyme Disease

    Terry Gehlhausen, DO, Deaconess Clinic, Oakland City

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness in the United States.  More than 100,000 cases have been reported since the disease was first discovered in 1982.  The disease is spread by the bite of a deer tick.

  • Father's Day

    Dr. Ron Pyle, Neonatologist at The Women's Hospital

    A day to remember for some, a day to reflect for others and hopefully a day to celebrate all our fathers and what they mean to us. For me, it is a day to say thank you to my hero, my role model, my father. It is also a day to measure how I’m doing as a Dad.





     

  • Top 20 Water Safety Tips for Children

    Dr. Taniza Karim, Deaconess Clinic Pediatrician 

    While enjoying the water is a memorable part of summer, water is one of the most ominous hazards your child will encounter. Young children can drown in only a few inches of water, even if they’ve had swimming instruction.  For youngsters in middle childhood, drowning ranks behind only motor-vehicle accidents as the leading cause of death.

  • Sun Safety Tips for Children

    Dr. Taniza Karim, Deaconess Clinic Pediatrician 

    Summer brings warmer weather and lots of opportunities for outdoor activities. With the fun also comes the risk of sunburns and skin damage. Follow these tips for a healthy and fun summer.

  • Child Summer Safety Tips

    Dr. Taniza Karim, Deaconess Clinic Pediatrician 

    The summer months are a special time during childhood.  Outdoor activities, vacations, camps, etc. all lead to lifelong memories. Discover the top ways to keep your children safe this summer and what habits to encourage (and avoid) during this long break from school.

  • The Learning Curve: Youth Baseball Pitching Guidelines & Perspectives

    C.J. Barnard, PT, DPT, SCS, CSCS Physical Therapist and Site Coordinator for Progressive Health at Deaconess

    Youth baseball injuries are increasing at an alarming rate despite a growing knowledge of how injuries occur.  Several reasons for this increased injury rate have been postulated (i.e. throwing curveballs too young, inadequate and/or incorrect instruction, sport specialization, etc.), but when you dig into the data, there seems to be a simple, overwhelming reason why youth pitchers are getting injured – OVERUSE. 
     

  • When To See a Doctor vs. Treat at Home

    Dr. Greg Rodocker, Deaconess Clinic Family Medicine

    Deciding when to see a doctor, whether for your own, a family member or a child’s illness, can be a difficult decision.   You know that sometimes a “virus is just a virus,” and that you just need to rest, drink lots of fluids, and give it a few days. But sometimes an illness needs treatment, whether through antibiotics or other medications and symptom care.

  • The Well-Stocked Medicine Cabinet

    Dr. Jung Smith, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic

    I think it’s wise to have a stash of basic medications for everyone in the family, so I want to share information about various over-the-counter medications, to help you decide what you should have in YOUR well-stocked medicine cabinet.

  • Vaccinating Your Child

    Errin Weisman, DO, Family Medicine Deaconess Clinic Petersburg

    Vaccinations.  They’re considered to be one of the biggest, most important medical advancements ever made against the spread of infectious disease.  They save lives and prevent so much suffering. But what do you really know about vaccines?
     

  • Back to School for College Students

    University of Southern Indiana - University Health Center Staff

    Young adults heading to college—or back to college—have unique health needs such as diet, sleep, exercise, illnesses, stress, mental health and immunizations/testing. 

  • 4 Steps to Safe Backpack Use

    Deaconess Medical Staff

    Whether it’s back to school time for your child, or you’re planning a long hike, check out these helpful tips to ensure you know how to safely wear a backpack and promote good posture and spinal health. 

  • No Bubble Gum Medicine Today

    Dr. Errin Weisman, Family Medicine

    Doctors are now writing fewer prescriptions for antibiotics for young children. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) recommend an end to routine antibiotic prescriptions. 

  • Back to School Tips

    Dr. Dolly Marx, Deaconess Clinic - West Pediatrician

    It’s back-to-school time, which means it’s a great time for some back-to-school tips from a Deaconess Clinic pediatrician. Learn more about getting into a routine, helping your child sleep at night, and school-smart nutrition.

  • Summer Safety Tips

    Tammy Hargett, FNP-C, Deaconess Clinic Mt. Pleasant, Family Practitioner

    If you have kids, you’re likely dealing with some safety worries associated with summer activities.
    Here are some tips to help your family have a safe and fun summer.
     

  • Ear Infections in Children

    Dr. Jung Smith, Family Medicine Physician

    Did you know that more than three out of four children will have at least one ear infection by their third birthday? In fact, according to UpToDate, between 60-80% of children have at least one ear infection by their first birthday, and 80-90% will by 2-3 years old. 

  • Concussion Questions & Answers

    Gina Niemeier, PA-C, of the Deaconess Concussion Clinic ​

    The Deaconess Concussion Clinic specializes in the assessment and treatment of concussions.  Through this blog post, I’ll explain what a concussion is, how to tell if you or someone you love has one, what should be done if you have a concussion and some prevention tips.

  • Keeping Your Teen Healthy

    Lauren Veazey, MD, Family Practice Physician

    Calling all (frazzled, busy) parents of teenagers! This article is about keeping your teenagers healthy.  You can get so busy keeping up with your teen’s social/academic/extracurricular lives that it’s easy to forget about keeping them healthy!
     

  • Sun Safety for Kids

    Deaconess Riley Children’s Services

    Summer is a great time for children to be healthy and active outdoors! However, with the sunny weather comes the risk of sun dangers. Follow these sun safety tips to ensure that you and your kiddos have a fun and safe summer!
     

  • Vaccines and Your Child

    Dr. Nancy Grauso-Eby, Deaconess Clinic Pediatrician​

    Vaccines.  They’re considered one of the greatest medical advancements in history, and can currently prevent 25 illnesses and diseases.  This is a topic that is so important to me and fellow pediatricians, as vaccinations are crucial part of caring for children. In this article, learn more about vaccines, including why they’re important and how they work.

  • All About Exercise for Kids!

    Kids exercise all the time without even knowing it. Running around outside or playing kickball at school, are two kinds of exercise. When you exercise, you are helping build a strong body that will be able to move around and do all the stuff you need to do.
     

  • Be a Fit Kid!

    There is a lot of discussion these days about fit kids. People who care for kids, like parents, doctors, health care professionals, and teachers, want to help kids be fit and healthy. Being fit is a way of saying a person eats well, gets a lot of exercise, and has a healthy weight. If you are fit, your body works well, feels good, and looks healthy. When you are fit, you can do all the things you want to do, like run and play with your family and friends.
     

  • Sleep Safety for Babies

    Keeping your baby safe is a top priority for parents. Here are some guidelines to help you maintain baby’s safety at night and during nap times.
     

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