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Your Health Blog

  • Infant Photography

    When you are selecting a photographer to capture your sweet baby’s milestones, there are many things to look for. Everyone wants the best quality of pictures, but we also want someone who is gentle with our baby. Choosing the right person for this can be a challenge. 

  • Why is it Important to Know My Family Medical History

    Knowing one’s family medical history allows a person to take steps to reduce his or her risk. You should address any concerns you have about your family history with your physician or another qualified healthcare professional such as a genetics counselor. 

  • Eat Your Veggies!

    The farmers have been busy in the fields this spring, and their hard work is beginning to show as vegetables ripen. Soon, road-side stands and farmers markets will be brimming with people anxious to purchase their fresh seasonal vegetables. But what about the people not excited for fresh produce season?

     

  • Flat Head Syndrome

    Positional plagiocephaly (flat head syndrome)-how do we help and prevent it?

  • How to Prevent Summer Brain Drain

    The end of school often brings the end of structured academic activities – at least during summer break.  Learn how to keep your child's mind and body active through these next months, so they're ready to return to a productive school year.

  • Managing Spring Allergies

    Anne McLaughlin, MD Deaconess Clinic Allergist 

    Are you sneezing, sniffling and itching? You’re in good company right now, in large part due to the high tree pollen counts. This year’s spring allergy season started late due to the prolonged winter season.  All the trees were delayed in pollinating, so everything bloomed at once, leading to misery for those with spring allergies.

  • Moms Support Circle

    Rachel Beier, BSN, RNC-OB, Maternal Care Advisor at The Women's Hospital

    Due to hormone changes after pregnancy, it is common to experience feelings of anxiety, sadness, or overwhelmed. The Women’s Hospital would like to assist you in your recovery with Mom’s Support Circle, our free, self-help group.

  • An Infertility Story: Journey to Baby Topper

    70 pills, 46 shots, 112 vaginal suppositories, numerous vaginal ultrasounds, and 2 years and 4 month’s time…
     

  • Seizures and Seizure Disorders

    Seizures are common, and commonly misunderstood. Many people will have a seizure in their lifetime, and 1 in 26 people will be diagnosed with a seizure disorder (epilepsy).  Learn the facts.
     

  • Conservative Treatments for Joint Pain

    Rhiannon Anderson, PA, Orthopaedic Associates

    Experiencing joint pain? Surgery is not your only option. There are many conservative (non-surgical) options that can provide significant relief from joint pain.

  • Sexually Transmitted Infections: A Reality That Must Be Discussed

    Rebecca Hopper, MD, Pediatrics/Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Henderson

    About 20 million United States citizens get a sexually transmitted infection each year, with 15 to 24-year-olds accounting for half of all new STIs. Protecting yourself against sexually transmitted infections is important and should be achieved not through fear, but rather education.

  • Knowing When to Take Your New Baby to the Doctor

    Bringing a new baby home is exciting and sometimes stressful. You want to do what’s best for your baby but how are you supposed to know what that is? What’s normal and what’s an emergency? Get tips from a pediatrician and a mom.

  • Easter Favorites: Healthy Variations on Classic Lunch & Brunch Recipes

    Special Easter gatherings bring to mind favorite foods. Here are some Easter favorites, but these recipes offer a few less calories without compromising on taste.
     

  • The Facts about Endometriosis

    Daniel Griffin, MD, FACOG, Reproductive Endocrinologist, Boston IVF at The Women's Hospital

    Endometriosis is a common condition in which part of the uterine lining or glands are located outside of the uterus. Typically the glandular tissue is located in the pelvis and abdomen. The most common symptoms of endometriosis are painful menstrual cycles, pain with intercourse, infertility or an ovarian mass. Learn about the most common treatments for Endometriosis.

  • Chronic Kidney Disease

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is very common—affecting about 14 percent of the US adult population. It’s closely related to diabetes and high blood pressure, and can cause serious complications.

  • Online Parenting Resources

    Don’t believe everything you read on the internet, especially when it comes to children's health information and parenting advice. That’s what I tell my patients and their parents. 
     

  • One Place for Breast Cancer Treatment

    Melody Littrell, Manager of Women’s Oncology & Breast Programs, The Women’s Hospital

    When a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer, she has many needs and concerns. One of the most important things she wants to know is that she’ll get the best care, beginning as quickly as possible. That’s why The Women’s Hospital and Deaconess Cancer Services decided to develop the Multidisciplinary Breast Cancer Clinic.
     

  • Women and Heart Disease: Pregnancy Induced Heart Failure

    Courtney Hoppenjans, OB and Heart patient, shares her 2014 story about pregnancy induced heart failure. Learn about why women should listen to their bodies and how the amazing teams from The Heart Hospital and The Women's Hospital helped save Courtney and her baby's life. 

  • Tasty and Healthy Recipes for the Big Game

    It’s almost time for the biggest football game of the year, which often means parties with lots of food! Here are some tasty recipe ideas and healthy tips to make your game day a waistline success.
     

  • Minimizing Visitors in the Hospital

    Can you believe it’s here? The day that your baby is born has finally arrived! Friends and family are excited and eager to meet the new addition to your family. Grandmas can’t wait to get their hands on that sweet baby and they will…in time. 
     

  • Gilda’s On The Go

    Melanie Atwood, Executive Director of Gilda’s Club of Evansville, part of Cancer Support Community

    An expanded relationship between Gilda’s Club and Deaconess Cancer Services will help cancer patients and their families receive important support services. Gilda’s on the Go will bring healthy lifestyle programs and activities directly to patients at the Chancellor Center for Oncology.
     

  • Keeping Resolutions in the New Year

    It’s that time of year again! New Year’s Day is around the corner and many of us are starting to think about making a resolution. But how do you stick to your resolution and not give up before Valentine’s Day? We’ve listed some tips below on how to make and keep momentum toward your New Year’s resolution throughout the year.

  • Managing the Pain of Shingles

    Sridhar Bhaskara, MD, Deaconess Comprehensive Pain Centers

    Shingles is a common, painful rash that will affect up to 1 in 5 people. Identifying and treating shingles quickly can prevent further pain and long-term complications.

  • Staying Healthy Through The Holidays

    The holiday season is upon us.  Learn tips for staying healthy and avoiding illness so you and your family can be well from now into the new year.
     

  • Healthy Holiday Tips from The Heart Hospital

    Learn about these healthy tips and why they’re important to you. 

  • Dear New Mom, Don't Forget About YOU

    The postpartum period—the days and weeks after giving birth--involves many emotional and physical changes for you as a new mother.  It also involves learning how to care for your newborn and how to function with the new demands at home. Adequate rest, good nutrition, and support from family and friends are crucial during the first few weeks after delivery to allow you to rebuild your strength.

  • 10 Baby Necessities: What Are They?

    You are in Babies R Us. Your husband has the scanner gun because, let’s be honest, the only way you could get him to join you was by promising he could play with the scanner gun. The haunting memory of registering for your wedding gifts 9 months prior is coming back. You are overwhelmed. You have never had a baby before! How are you supposed to know what you need?!

  • Planning & Goal-Setting to Prevent Holiday Weight Gain

    When your goal is weight loss, this time of the year can be a difficult time, as high-calorie, great-tasting food seems to be everywhere!  Here are some tips that can help you navigate through the weeks ahead.
     

  • Medication Assisted Treatment Program for Opioid Addiction

    Donna Lilly, MS, LCSW, LCAC, Chemical Dependency Treatment Coordinator, Deaconess Cross Pointe

    Discussions about the opioid crisis are everywhere. You may have heard stories on the news, read articles posted on social media, or had first-hand experience with a friend or loved one. Learn about a program at Deaconess Cross Pointe that helps people addicted to opioids (heroin, prescription pain pills, etc.) and move into recovery.
     

  • What Is Palliative Care?

    Dr. Anna Dauer, Deaconess Palliative Care Medical Director, and Andrea Lantz, LCSW, Palliative Care Clinical Social Worker

    Perhaps you’ve heard the term “palliative care” but weren’t sure what it meant. Palliative care is specialized medical care for people with chronic illnesses, focusing on providing patients with relief from the symptoms, pain and stress of a chronic illness regardless of the diagnosis. The overall goal is to improve quality of life for both the patient and the family.
     

  • Choosing Toys for Young Children

    Choosing toys for a young child this holiday season?  Learn more about open ended toys, and why they’re important for developing minds.
     

  • Resources for Family Caregivers

    Lorrie Fox, ACSW, LCSW, Care Coordinator at Deaconess Primary Care for Seniors, and Ariel Myers from Deaconess VNA Home Care and Hospice

    Caregiving for an aging loved one can be both rewarding and challenging. Many caregivers don’t know about resources and services that can help make their jobs easier and improve the quality of life for themselves and their loved one.

  • Heartburn or GERD?

    When is heartburn more than just heartburn? The quick answer is when the heartburn happens two or more times per week over several weeks, your taco dinner with hot sauce isn’t to blame and it may be time to talk to your doctor about GERD.
     

  • Painful Bladder--Could It Be Interstitial Cystitis?

    Interstitial cystitis (I.C.) is a problem with the lining of the bladder and is often called painful bladder syndrome or irritable bladder – and for good reasons, it's painful! I.C. occurs mostly in women, is underdiagnosed and often mistaken for a urinary tract infection.
     

  • Pregnancy and Infant Loss

    October is National Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness month.  The loss of a pregnancy or baby is a life changing event.  No matter the gestational age of the little one, you may hurt physically, emotionally, mentally and spiritually.  The loss of a little one is not something families “just get over.”  Families grieve and mourn and eventually learn to live a “new normal” life. 

  • Flu Vaccinations and Pregnant Women

    The flu shot has traditionally been an important part of a pregnant woman’s prenatal care. This year, the flu shot has become a controversial issue due to a recent study and proposed association between the flu shot and miscarriage.  Learn more about the study and flu vaccinations so you are knowledgeable and informed.

     

  • What All Women Should Know About Mammograms

    Marc Johnson, MD and Janine Morris, MD, Radiologists, Deaconess Breast Services

    Breast cancer will develop in 1 in 8 American women in her lifetime, so it’s very important that women be informed about options and recommendations for early detection.  
     

  • Understanding CHF (Congestive Heart Failure)

    Brian Wellington, DO, Deaconess Clinic Henderson- Starlite

    Congestive heart failure, or CHF, is a very common, serious chronic condition and it’s a factor in 1 in 9 deaths. It's important to understand how your heart should work properly, and what happens when it doesn’t. 
     

  • Know Where to Go For Care

    Amanda Bohleber, MD, Medical Director, Deaconess Clinic

    A doctor—and mom—shares her tips for choosing the right care at the right time at the right place.

  • Making the Most of Your Doctor’s Appointment

    Ankita Bahuva, MD, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Downtown

    Your doctors’ appointments are an important and valuable time to connect with your doctor, share your perspective and information, and learn from your doctor’s expertise.  The best appointments happen when patients are very prepared.
     

  • Keeping Your Baby Safe

    Baby safety is important for all new parents, but it doesn’t just stop there. Who else should stay up-to-date on the topic of keeping babies safe? Grandparents, older siblings, aunts, uncles and any other caregiver who may babysit or have a baby at their house can all benefit from these tips.
     

  • Fighting Chronic Fatigue

    Ankita Bahuva, MD, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Downtown

    Chronic fatigue is a condition that causes someone to be extremely tired—to the point that they can’t function in their daily life.  It is also often misunderstood.
     

  • Emergency Preparedness for Patients with Health Problems

    Jim Hays, Deaconess Home Medical Equipment, and Tom Fite, R.Ph, Manager, Deaconess Family Pharmacy

    Recent national disasters have caused many people to give more thought to emergency preparedness.  As September is Emergency Preparedness Month, it’s a great time to be thinking about being disaster ready.
     

  • Which Cancer Screenings You Need, When, and WHY

    Mohammed Allaw, MD Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Gateway Professional Building

    Cancer screening recommendations can be confusing for many people--in my 20 years of practicing primary care medicine for adults, thousands of patients have had questions about various cancer screenings. 

    In this article, I’ll focus on breast, prostate, lung, colon and skin cancer screenings.

  • An Urgent Need to Solve Your Annoying Problem – Overactive Bladder

    Do you experience any of the following?

    • Frequent urination
    • A persistent “urgent feeling” to urinate
    • Frequently waking up at night to urinate
    • Involuntary loss of urine
    If so, then you may have a urinary disorder known as Overactive Bladder (OAB).
     

  • Why Am I So Tired?

    Dr. Rebecca Hopper, Internal Medicine/Pediatrician, Deaconess Clinic Henderson Starlite

    Patients often ask me, “Why am I so tired all the time?” This question, of course, has many possible and complex answers. Caring for our families, working long hours or just doing the many daily tasks of living can make us tired. However, one common medical cause of significant daytime fatigue is obstructive sleep apnea.
     

  • Atopic Dermatitis: The Itch for New Treatments

    J. Clay Davis, MD, Deaconess Clinic Dermatology

    Uncontrollable itching. Cracked, scaly, or dry skin. Small raised bumps that ooze when scratched. If your child suffers from any of these symptoms, they might have a severe form of eczema known as atopic dermatitis. Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic skin condition that can occur in people of any age; however, it most commonly begins in childhood and improves as people approach adulthood.
     

  • Health Screenings Men Need - When & Why

    Michael Luy, MD, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Downtown

    Health screenings help doctors and other providers detect conditions at earlier, more treatable stages.

  • Weight Loss From An Expert's Perspective

    Tammy Ransom, Nurse Practitioner at Deaconess Weight Loss Solutions

    When it comes to losing weight, there are some first steps that everyone should try. There are also some weight loss methods that I don’t recommend, either because they don’t work or because they aren’t healthy. These general recommendations can not only help with weight loss, but will also improve overall health and well-being. 
     

  • Treating Joint Pain - What To Do and When to See a Doctor

    Jared Kiernicki, PA, Orthopaedic Associates

    If you’re experiencing pain in any joint—your knee, ankle, shoulder, hip, etc.—you need to know how to best treat it at home. It’s also important to know when it’s time to see a doctor.
     
     

  • Mediterranean Diet—A Healthy Diet for Life

    Dr. Mary Ann Bieker, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Downtown

    One third of the adults in the United States are obese--that is, they have a BMI (body mass index weight/height) greater than 30. It seems these days everyone is trying to diet to lose weight or simply be healthier.
     

  • What's in YOUR grocery cart?

    Learn some healthy shopping tips from registered dietitian Debbie P. from Deaconess Weight Loss Solutions. 

  • The ABCs of Hepatitis

    Rubin Bahuva, MD, Gastroenterologist, Deaconess Clinic
     
    You’ve likely heard of hepatitis, and you may’ve even heard that some types of hepatitis are identified by letters A, B, & C. I’m glad to be writing about this, as so many people don’t know enough about hepatitis. It’s a serious issue, as hepatitis can cause serious illness and severe liver damage. Hepatitis C in particular is of concern, as more than 3 million Americans are infected—mostly “Baby Boomers.” Hepatitis C is actually the most common reason people need a liver transplant.

  • Keeping Kids Busy and Active During the Summer

    By Deaconess Editorial Staff
     
    School is out, the weather is warm, and you need to keep the kids busy. Hours on the couch watching TV or playing video games isn’t something that will keep their bodies healthy.

  • Major Depressive Disorder: Taking Back Control of Your Life

    Michelle Galen, MD; Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic

    A feeling of sadness that doesn’t seem to go away. Unexplained weight gain or weight loss.  Inability to focus. Fatigued but just can’t sleep.  If this sounds familiar, you may be experiencing major depression episodes caused by a disease called Major Depressive Disorder or MDD.  If you have MDD you’re not alone. Depression affects 15.7 million American adults.

  • 8 Reasons to Shop at Your Local Farmers Market

    Rebekah Basham, PA Deaconess Clinic 

    In recent years, local farmers markets have “sprouted up” and given us new opportunities for buying fresh produce, socializing and more.

    Farmers markets are retail markets set up for local farmers, artisans and food vendors to sell goods. You can count on fresh, quality produce and products to incorporate into your healthy lifestyle. Here are 8 reasons to consider shopping at your local Farmers Market. 

  • Early Symptoms of Heart Disease

    Dominic Cefali, MD, PhD, Cardiothoracic Surgeon, The Heart Group

    In my nearly 20 years of practice, I've had thousands of patients tell me that they can look back and recognize symptoms they were having prior to their heart attack--certain "warning signs" in the days/weeks/months leading up to the heart attack.

  • The Importance of Folic Acid

    Jennifer Deutsch, RD, Nutrition Services/Dietician Manager at The Women's Hospital
     
    Taking a prenatal vitamin with folic acid before and during pregnancy can help prevent birth defects of your baby's brain and spinal cord. The CDC suggests that you start taking folic acid supplements daily for at least one month before you become pregnant and continue during pregnancy.

     

  • Be Motorcycle Aware!

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center

    Motorcyclists have all the same rights and privileges as any motor vehicle driver on the road. This means they are entitled to their space on the road, no matter the size of their ride. This also means that they must follow the same road laws as other vehicles, including keeping a safe distance from other vehicles. Remember to “share the road” with motorcyclists, and to be extra alert to help keep motorcyclists safe. 

  • FYI on UTIs

    Dr. Vivien Tucker, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Darmstadt

    In my career I’ve treated thousands of urinary tract infections. They’re very common, can be quite painful, and can cause serious complications if untreated. 

  • What’s Happening to My Body? 10 Common Pregnancy Discomforts

    Rachel Beier, BSN, RNC-OB, Maternal Care Advisor at The Women's Hospital

    There can be many discomforts to a woman's body that may accompany pregnancy. Consulting with your doctor is always an important thing to do when suffering from any sort of pain, but you may find these tips below to be helpful to ease common pregnancy discomforts. 

  • High Risk Pregnancy

    What is a high risk pregnancy? There are many conditions that can complicate a pregnancy, classifying it high risk. A high risk pregnancy can include problems with the mother or problems with the baby.

  • Keeping Your Relationship Healthy During Pregnancy and Parenthood

    Cynthia Nunn, RNC-OB, Maternal Care Advisor at The Women's Hospital

    During my first pregnancy, I remember being tired all the time. Like, all the time. So unbelievably tired! There were moments I literally thought I was a crazy person.
     
    People had warned us of the effects a newborn would have on our life. However, we couldn’t really see past the rose-colored glasses which displayed the perfect little family and the perfect little child. Sleep deprivation was not part of the image portrayed in our minds. Yet this became a huge reality that neither myself, nor Ryan (my husband) really knew how to handle.

  • 10 Things Your Doctor Wishes Men Would Do To Protect Their Health: Part 1

    Michael W. Luy, MD, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Downtown
     
    June is Men’s Health Month, a time for men to reflect on ways they can better care for themselves to be at their best for themselves and their families.

  • Enjoying Fireworks Safely

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center

    Summer is synonymous with barbeques, parades and fireworks. But along with all of the celebrations come injuries from fireworks. While many of the injuries come from amateurs attempting to use professional grade, homemade, or illegal fireworks or explosives, about half of fireworks injuries come from legal, less powerful devices. Fireworks are also responsible for thousands of home and other structural fires each year. 

  • Swaddling

    Rachel Beier, BSN, RNC, Maternal Care Advisor at The Women's Hospital

    What does it mean to be swaddled? Swaddling is wrapping a blanket snugly around an infant.  Why do babies like to be swaddled? It helps to soothe them because it mimics the feeling a baby has inside Mom’s belly.

  • Fun and Safety with ATVs

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center

    The first week of June is ATV Safety Week. Sadly, 90% of all ATV-related fatalities could be prevented, as they are the result of behaviors that are warned about, such as children riding on adult-sized ATVs. 

  • Smoking Cessation During Pregnancy

    Janice Hatler, BSN, RN, IBCLC, Community Education at The Women's Hospital

    Smoking remains a major public health issue because of its many well -known health risks such as heart disease and cancers. The health risks are even more serious for a woman that continues to smoke during her pregnancy due to the negative affects it has on the developing baby. Some of these risks include miscarriages, delivering low birth babies, babies born with birth defects and the risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

  • National Water Safety Month

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center

    It’s summer, which means swimming and other water-related activities will fill the coming months, especially if you have children. Although playing in the water is fun, there are some inherent dangers. By following the tips below, you can have fun and remain safe at the same time. Simple steps save lives!

  • Myths & Facts about Hospice

    Cheryl Arnold, Hospice Manager, Deaconess VNA

    There are many questions and misunderstandings about hospice. Hospice can be an emotionally-charged topic, so knowing and understanding the facts about hospice care can help make conversations and decisions easier.

    Below, I address some of the most common myths, or incorrect beliefs, about hospice, and share additional information about why hospice is a wonderful service and resource for families when a loved one has a terminal condition. 

  • How Dads Can Help After Baby Arrives

    Rachel Beier, RNC-OB, Maternal Care Advisor at The Women's Hospital
     
    Being a part of your newborn’s life from the beginning is very important. Dad’s involvement promotes family bonding, increases the longevity and security of the new family, and decreases stress.  Dads can help ease the transition of adding a new baby to the family in the following ways.

  • Preeclampsia Awareness Month

    Dr. Spencer Kuper, Perinatologist, Tri-State Perinatology at The Women's Hospital

    May is Preeclampsia Awareness Month. Many may recognize the diagnosis, sometimes called toxemia, as the cause of a dramatic turn of events in the popular PBS drama “Downton Abbey.”

    One of the main characters, Lady Sybil Crawley, is in labor with her first child. The family’s doctor explains that Sybil has preeclampsia and is in danger. He recognizes the signs of the complication; she has protein in her urine, her ankles are swollen, and her baby is small.

  • Stop The Bleed

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center

    Violence is the third leading cause of traumatic injury and death in our region. Natural disasters occur fairly routinely throughout the world. Accidents happen at home, school, and work. And sadly, in today’s society, we must also consider the possibility of a mass shooting event. 

  • The "Sweetness" of Motherhood from a Professional Doctor and Amateur Baker

    Dr. Darla Grossman, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic West
     
    As Mother’s Day approaches, it is a good time to count blessings and lick a spoonful of icing from the bowl. Motherhood (and grandmotherhood, I am discovering), actually has many sweet moments, and is like mixing, baking and putting together a cake.

  • Helping Children Who Are Hurting - Understanding ACEs: Adverse Childhood Experiences

    Janie Chappell, Manager of Community Services at Deaconess Cross Pointe, and Susan Phelps, Director of Neuroeducation, Evansville-Vanderburgh School Corporation
     
    Some of the most significant predictors of adolescent and adult substance abuse, mental illness, learning difficulties and other serious social problems are ACEs—Adverse Childhood Experiences.  

  • Understanding Peripheral Neuropathy

    Brittney Fulcher, NP-C, Deaconess Comprehensive Pain 
     
    Peripheral neuropathy affects an estimated 20 million people. It is often very painful and difficult to treat, and the symptoms can range from mild to more severe. This is a diagnosis that we evaluate and treat on a daily basis at our pain centers, yet some patients have dealt with this condition for years without helpful treatment. For some, this condition is nothing more than an annoyance and is easily treated by their primary care provider; for patients we treat, it is usually much more severe. 

  • Preventing & Treating Osteoporosis

    Dr. Darla Grossman, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic West

    Osteoporosis, a condition in which bones become weak and brittle, is a common condition that can have serious consequences—including premature death from complications of broken bones.

  • Baby Blues

    Sarah Kluender, LSW, Wellness and Counseling Services at The Women's Hospital

    You've been preparing for the last several months for the arrival of your new baby.  The nursery is ready.  You have everything you will need in order to care for the new baby.  Delivery went well and you and baby have returned home from the hospital, but something just doesn’t seem right.
     

  • Mommy Guilt....Let it Go!

    Kimberly Foster, MD, OB/GYN, Women's Health Care P.C. 

    As an OB/GYN physician (and mother of 5 boys), I am given the awesome opportunity to take care of expecting families. The majority of the articles for expecting moms are focused on our “first-time-moms”. As we approach Mother's Day, I want to focus on moms that are experienced or “veteran-mommies.”

  • Our Premature Miracle Baby

    Jenna Fettes, Wife and mother of two boys

    A week prior to the scary evening when I knew something wasn't right, we found out we were having a boy. We already decided on the name Asher, as I love names that have special meaning and are more unique. God truly guided us to the perfect name because Asher means "happy, blessed, fortunate," which truly defines him! 

  • Infertility Awareness

    Daniel Griffin, MD, Reproductive Endocrinologist, Boston IVF at The Women's Hospital

    At the end of April each year, we observe National Infertility Awareness Week. Often times, as a fertility specialist (reproductive endocrinologist), I am asked when people should consider fertility care and treatment, if referrals are necessary and what to expect. Below are my answers to a few of the most common questions I get with regard to fertility care and treatment.

  • Adult Vaccines

    Rebekah Basham, PA, Deaconess Clinic Mary Street

    Most people are aware pediatric vaccinations are very important and prevent serious diseases and related complications. However, people often forget there are adult vaccinations and boosters that are recommended to keep us healthy and prevent complications associated with certain infections. 

  • Joint Replacement FAQs

    Brooke Kline, PA-C, Orthopaedic Associates 
     
    When someone is considering joint replacement, many questions come to mind about what to expect from the overall process—before surgery, during the hospital stay, and afterwards. 

  • Kick Counts

    Rachel Beier, BSN, RNC, Maternal Care Advisor at The Women's Hospital

    Your baby’s movement can be an indicator of fetal well-being. Many doctors encourage mothers to track their baby’s movements starting at 28 weeks of pregnancy. Monitoring movement also helps mothers to bond with their babies and learn their activity patterns.

  • Big Brother, Big Sister

    Rachel Beier, BSN, RNC, Maternal Care Advisor at The Women’s Hospital

    With the addition of a baby, will there also be a new big brother or big sister in your house? Have you thought about the effect a new baby will have on your children? 

  • Probiotics and Prebiotics – What They Mean To Your Health

    Dr. Mark Graves, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Downtown
     
    Probiotics and prebiotics—these are some health and nutrition “buzz words” right now. But do you know what they mean, and how pre-and-probiotics may affect your health?

  • Colon Screening Saves Lives – A Patient’s Perspective

    Grant Glackman, patient and Dr. Rubin Bahuva, Deaconess Clinic Gastroenterologist

    You’ve heard that colon cancer screening saves lives. In this article, a patient shares his story about how a routine colonoscopy may’ve saved his life at the age of 61. He and his doctor together explain what a colonoscopy is, and why it’s important.  

  • Sports Injuries – Knowing How To Treat, When To Get Medical Care

    Daren Vertein, RN, FNP-BC, Deaconess Urgent Care and James Boulware, MA, ATC, LAT, Orthopaedic Associates Walk-In/Urgent Care

    Any sporting event, practice or training can lead to injuries.  Some injuries are minor, but others need urgent medical care. Below we discuss helpful information about how to handle a variety of common injuries resulting from nearly any sport.

  • Benefits of Acupuncture During Pregnancy

    By Flora Arzanipour, MSOM, Licensed Acupuncturist, Center for Healing Arts, The Women’s Hospital

    Many pregnant women have symptoms that may cause them discomfort. Acupuncture is a safe and effective way to help relieve these symptoms. Besides providing relief for the mother, research shows that one acupuncture session a month during pregnancy can greatly improve your baby’s health.

  • Are Your Finances 'Baby Ready'?

    Rachel Beier, BSN, RNC, Maternal Care Advisor at The Women's Hospital
     
    Your family is about to grow in size, and with that growth comes added costs.  Some parents may wonder how they are going to manage their day-to-day expenses while still pursuing their family’s long term aspirations.  Are you prepared financially for your baby’s birth? 

  • Expecting Twins, Triplets, or More?!?

    Rachel Beier, BSN, RNC, Maternal Care Advisor at The Women's Hospital

    Many women who are pregnant with multiples (2 or more babies) are excited but also anxious. Some common thoughts that may go through your mind when expecting multiples include...

  • How To Talk To Your Kids About Sex

    Jason Hays, LCSW and Beth Petersen, PsyD, Deaconess Clinic Behavioral Health

    This blog is about the talk that no one wants to have: The Talk…the talk with your kids about sex, where babies come from, etc.

    But one of the first points we want to make is that this shouldn’t just be one talk—to really help your kids understand sexuality, and make good choices, there should be open communication over many years, and many discussions should be had.
     

  • Being Smart About Online Health Information

    Gail Lee, Deaconess Health Science Librarian

    Researching health topics online can be frustrating, confusing and even scary, as it can be hard to know if information you find is correct and accurate. This article will empower you know how to find quality health information, and to recognize potentially bad sources of information.

  • How To Talk To Your Teenager About Sex

    Jason Hays, LCSW, Deaconess Clinic Behavioral Health

    Many parents find it difficult to talk with their children about sex—they don’t want to say the wrong things, or have to think back about decisions they made as teenagers.  Teens may also be embarrassed, not trust their parent's advice, or prefer not to talk with their parents about it. But sex is an important topic to talk about.

  • Common ENT Problems in Kids

    Dr. David Wahle, Deaconess Clinic ENT physician  

    Issues with ear, nose and throat health seem to be a part of childhood. I’ve been a practicing otolaryngologist/head and neck surgeon for more than 20 years here in Evansville.  In that time I’ve treated thousands of children who have had problems with their ears, nose and throat that required surgery.

  • Atrial Fibrillation - causes, symptoms and treatment

    Chandra Kumbar, MD,  The Heart Group,  Electrophysiologist

    I have been practicing as a physician in Evansville for over a decade and greatly enjoy my work in the cardiology field, my colleagues, and patients at The Heart Hospital at Deaconess Gateway. In my role as a heart rhythm specialist with The Heart Group, I treat patients who have irregular heart rhythms. The most common heart rhythm issue, and the one I would like to talk about, is Atrial Fibrillation, or “AFib.” 

  • Breast Milk is the Best Baby Food

    Janice Hatler BSN, RN, IBCLC
     
    Breastfeeding is a natural way to feed babies, and provides infants with nutrition that cannot be matched by formula. Many people are aware that breastfeeding has health benefits for baby; however, moms who choose to breastfeed their babies enjoy many long and short-term benefits as well.

  • The Baby is Here! Now What?

    Karla Kitch, MD, Deaconess Pediatric Hospitalist

    You’ve carefully followed your obstetrician’s instructions, and delivered a healthy baby… but now the BIG questions start to pop up. Usually these questions come to mind when it’s least convenient to you and often after your pediatrician’s office has closed for the day.  Here are some things to consider for these first few sweet but exhausting weeks!  

  • A Cancer Vaccine – Preventing Cervical and Head and Neck Cancers Through HPV Immunization

    Dr. Jacklyn Oakley, Faculty, Deaconess Family Medicine Residency

    HPV—the Human Papilloma virus—is a major topic of conversation across numerous aspects of the medical field.  Why?  There are several reasons.

  • Getting Organized for Better Health

    Gabriella Eddings, BS, CHC, Wellness Coach, Deaconess Employee Wellness

    Every January 1 many people are motivated and excited for a fresh start. But about a week in, we sometimes start to weigh if our resolutions are really worth the effort. Lack of motivation, busy schedules and stress are just some of the reasons we abandon our resolutions and start to rationalize how we were living before December 31. So how do we keep that motivation going throughout the year, or even throughout the entire month of January?  

  • Having a Happy—and Safe—Holiday Season

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center
     
    Christmas is the most wonderful time of the year for many people, but the decorations, special activities and gatherings can cause safety issues.   So many visits to the ED—during the holidays and otherwise--can be prevented by taking safety precautions. Also, injuries, fires and other disasters that happen around the holidays seem to be extra-challenging and sad for those involved.

  • Seasonal Affective Disorder – More Than the “Winter Blahs”

    Scott Gibson, LMHC, Clinical Supervisor, Outpatient Services, Deaconess Cross Pointe

    If you are one of the millions of Americans who finds themselves “in a funk” through the colder and darker months, you may be experiencing seasonal affective disorder, or SAD.

  • Episodic Migraines: Treating Migraines Doesn’t Have to be a Headache

    Michelle Galen, MD, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic
     
    Although migraine symptoms are consistent across classifications, there are two clinical distinctions: Episodic Migraines and Chronic Migraines.  Patients with episodic migraines experience 14 or fewer “headache days” per month whereas chronic migraine sufferers have 15 or more “headache days” per month.  

  • Health Benefits of Giving

    We all know that it’s “good” to give. Giving to charitable causes helps these organizations to continue functioning, providing services, and helping the community. But did you know that giving is actually good for your physical and mental health? 

  • No, It’s Not “Normal” and You Don’t Have to “Live With It” - Treating Incontinence, Pelvic Pain and More

    Amanda Phelps-Jones, WHNP-BC of the Pelvic Health and Wellness Center at The Women’s Hospital
     
    Incontinence, pelvic pain and other issues should not be considered “normal” or something you simply “have to live with.”  Pelvic health problems happen to many women, and are often related to pregnancy and childbirth, weakening pelvic muscles and tissue changes related to menopause and aging, and several other causes.

  • Understanding Hospice

    Chanda Liebo, Director of Hospice Operations, and Kim Anderson, Inpatient Clinical Manager, Deaconess VNA Home Care & Hospice

    There are a many questions regarding hospice, such as, “What services are included?”, “How is it paid for?”, and more.  Below are answers to some of these most common questions, as well as additional information about why hospice is a wonderful service and resource for families when a loved one has a terminal condition. 

  • Screening for Lung Cancer Saves Lives

    Dr. Jugesh Cheema, Radiologist, Evansville Radiology
    Mariah Atkinson, BSN, RN, Deaconess Cancer Services Nurse Navigator


    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death, killing more Americans than breast, prostate and colon cancer combined. Fortunately, there is a screening tool available for those at risk for lung cancer, but many people don’t take advantage of this option.

  • How To Help Someone in an Abusive Situation

    Heather Phelps, Therapist, Deaconess Cross Pointe, and Leslie James-Wilhite, Crisis Response Advocate, and Rachel Gumble, Community Engagement Director, Albion Fellow Bacon Center

    Maybe you know someone who you think is in an abusive relationship, but you don’t know how to help her (or him). We want to help you know how to help someone you care about….what to do and say, and what NOT to do and say.

  • Type II Diabetes: Managing Your Options

    Mark Graves, MD, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic 

    According to the Centers for Disease Control, over 29 million Americans have diabetes and of those 29 million, one in four people do not know they have diabetes.
     

  • Understanding Psoriasis

    Celine Mestel, MD, PhD, Deaconess Clinic Dermatology

    Psoriasis is a common chronic skin condition that affects about 1-2% of the population, and is one of the most common diseases that dermatologists treat.
     

  • On the Run: Managing Diarrhea

    Jacklyn Oakley, MD, Deaconess Family Medicine Residency
     
    Few things can make a person as miserable as a case of diarrhea (also known as “the runs, “the trots” and other charming euphemisms).  No one wants to talk about it, but I’m going to because I want to help you know how to treat diarrhea well at home-- both to ease the misery as quickly as possible, and to possibly prevent an unnecessary doctor’s visit.  

  • Keeping Pain in Check

    Brittney Fulcher, NP, Deaconess Comprehensive Pain Centers
     
    Pain will affect everyone at some point in their life. Pain can occur suddenly or can come about slowly and may vary in intensity from mild to more severe pain. The presence of pain is usually an indication that something is wrong within the body. Pain can be acute (temporary)—usually lasting three months or less--or chronic (long term). 

  • Knowing the Signs of Alzheimer’s

    Aziz Mehrzad, MD, Deaconess Primary Care for Seniors
     

    More than 5 million people in the US suffer from Alzheimer’s Disease, and it is currently the 6th leading cause of death in this country—more than prostate and breast cancer combined.  

  • Fall Prevention: Steps to Make Falls Less Likely

    Deaconess Regional Trauma Team

    Lack of exercise can lead to weak legs, which increases the chance of falling. Exercise programs can increase strength and improve balance, making falls less likely.
     

  • Setting Social Media Boundaries for Kids and Teens

    Scott Gibson, LMHC, Clinical Supervisor, Outpatient Services at Deaconess Cross Pointe

    As a parent, setting healthy social media boundaries for your children can make a significant difference in their emotional health, school performance, development and more.  

  • Kids and Stress

    Dr. Pamela Rogers, MD Pediatrics Deaconess Clinic 

    Kids and stress. Growing up can be hard sometimes, and back-to-school is a time of change, growth and yes, stress.  

  • Understanding Hand, Foot & Mouth Disease

    Capri Weyer, MD Pediatrics Deaconess Clinic 

    Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is a viral infection most commonly caused by coxsackievirus.  Although it can be seen in any age group, it is usually seen in young children. “Outbreaks” are also common in late summer and early fall—August into October.
     

  • Healthy Snack Ideas for Kids

    Deaconess MyHealth editorial staff

    Trying to think of some new ideas for healthy snacks for kids?  We’ve done the looking for you! Below are some cute, creative and nutritious snack ideas for kids of all ages.

  • Be Smart and Buckle Up—Here’s Why

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center
     
    Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death among those aged 1-54. For adults and older children (who are big enough for seat belts to fit properly), seat belt use is the most effective way to save lives and reduce injuries in crashes. 

  • Gear Up For Safe Sports

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center
     
    Sports and recreational activities are an important part of a healthy, physically active lifestyle – for kids and adults alike. But more than 2.6 million people are treated in emergency departments throughout the US each year for sports and recreation-related injuries.

  • Understanding Sepsis

    Ruston Stoltz MD, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic
     
    Sepsis is a serious complication of an infection, and it can happen to anyone.  Young or old, sepsis can be life threatening, as between ¼ and ½ of all individuals who develop sepsis will die from it.

  • Don’t Be Bugged by Bugs

    Rebecca Hopper, MD Internal Medicine & Pediatrics, Deaconess Clinic
     
    Summer is a time when most of us head for the outdoors--even if it’s just our own backyard. The season provides a time to get more exercise, eat fresh produce, and perhaps most importantly lower our stress by enjoying nature.  

  • Alternative Treatments for Autism

    Michelle Galen, MD Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic
     
    Autism spectrum disorder is a developmental disorder that affects the brain. It can be characterized by social interaction difficulty, behavioral differences and communication challenges.

  • Walk On, and Walk Safety

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center

    Walking is one of the best things we can do to stay healthy, but only if we put safety first. We are seldom more vulnerable than when walking. It is important to pay attention to what is going on around us.

  • Skateboarding Safety Tips

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center

    Skateboarding is fun, and can be great for building strength, balance and stamina.  But without the right precautions, young people can get hurt.

  • Tasty & Healthy—Fresh From the Garden

    Jessica Martin, Deaconess Registered Dietitian, Clinical Dietitian

    Summer is in full swing!  Its presence surrounds you with the warmth of the sun and humidity in the air, children enjoying outdoor activities, outdoor grilling, and the wonderful fruits and vegetables the season has to offer. 

  • Women And Bone Health

    Kim Snyder, PT, Clinic Director, High Pointe Therapy at The Women's Hospital

    Women seem to be very conscientious about getting routine exams completed.  Whether it is a mammogram, yearly physical, and colonoscopy or bone density.  When getting the results we are relieved when everything is negative or normal.

  • 10 Things Doctors Wish Men Would Do To Protect Their Health – Part 2

    Michael W. Luy, MD, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Downtown
     
    In Part One of this article, I discussed making the most of your doctor’s visit, the dangers of tobacco, the benefits of exercise and sleep, and how you can best monitor your salt intake.

  • The Survivorship Journey

    Claire Sutherby BSN, RN, CMSRN, Oncology Survivorship Nurse Navigator

    Earlier this month, Deaconess celebrated National Cancer Survivors Day with a special party for cancer survivors and their family and friends.   We celebrated because being a cancer survivor is a special thing!

  • Fussy Baby? May Be The Formula

    Wm. Michael Crecelius, MD Pediatrics, Deaconess Clinic  

    New parents are familiar with getting little sleep, middle-of-the-night feedings and round-the-clock supervision of infants.  The term “fussy” is often used with babies who experience gastrointestinal distress, bloating, spitting up, constipation or diarrhea after eating.  

  • Keeping Kids Busy and Active During the Summer

    By Deaconess MyHealth editorial staff
     
    School is out, the weather is warm, and you need to keep the kids busy.  Hours on the couch watching TV or playing video games isn’t something that will keep their bodies healthy.
    Here are some suggestions on local ideas that will keep the kiddos busy and moving:

  • Drug / Alcohol Addictions and Mental Illness: Co-occurring Disorders

    Donna Lilly, MS, LCSW, LCAC, Chemical Dependency Coordinator, Deaconess Cross Pointe

    Co-occurring disorders are very common and are characterized by a co-existing mental disorder and a chemical dependency/addiction. 

  • In the Know About Knee Pain

    Dr. Daniel Emerson, Orthopaedic Associates, Deaconess Joint Replacement Program

    If you suffer from knee pain, you’re not alone.  Out of approximately 320 million people living in the United States, more than 40 million suffer some form of arthritis.

  • Addressing Acne: New Strategies for an Age-Old Problem

    Michelle Galen, MD Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic 

    Pimples and blemishes can be a stubborn problem, even past the teenage years. Learn more about treatment options.
     

  • How To Get A Good Night’s Sleep

    Getting a good night’s sleep is a critical part of living a healthy life.  Sleep is when our bodies repair themselves, and inadequate sleep has been linked to heart disease, stroke, diabetes, weight gain and depression.
     

  • Autism: Knowing the Signs and the Importance of Early Intervention

    Sara Dillon, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner, Certified Pediatric Primary Care Mental Health Specialist, Deaconess Riley Children’s Services

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a lifelong developmental disability.  Many people don’t understand autism and the importance of recognizing signs and symptoms in young children so they can get the early help they need.   

  • Alcohol – the Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    Donna Lilly, LCSW, LCAC, SAP, Chemical Dependency Treatment Coordinator, Deaconess Cross Pointe and Lynn Schnautz, MSN, RN, CCRN, CCNS, NP-C, Nurse Practitioner/Clinical Nurse Specialist, The Heart Hospital

    There can be a lot of confusion about alcohol and its effects on your health.  How much alcohol—and what kind—is good for you?

  • Getting Started with Physical Activity - Get Motivated!

    Dr. Jung Smith, Family  Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Mary Street

    If you've not been physically active, you may be wondering how to get started.  For many people, walking offers a great way to become more active. And Deaconess is getting ready to begin our annual Healthier U Walk series—see the schedule and more at www.deaconess.com/walk

  • Helping Kids Develop Healthy Eating Habits

    Taniza Karim, MD Pediatrician, Deaconess Clinic Boonville
     
    Every day we learn more about the importance of nutrition in the health of children, both now and as they become adults.
     

  • Get Screened – It’s Simple and Could Save Your Life

    Dr. Devi Kodali, Deaconess Cancer Services
     
    March is Colon Cancer Awareness Month, so we are working to increase awareness about the importance of colon cancer screening. Did you know that only 4 in 10 cases of colon cancer are diagnosed at early stages?  

  • Sneezing, runny nose, feeling miserable…is it a cold or allergies?

    Jason White, MD Deaconess Clinic Allergist

    “Doc, I’m miserable.  Do I have a cold or allergies?”
    I hear this question a lot.  The last thing anyone wants is a runny nose and constant sneezing to make the winter more drawn out and miserable.
     

  • 10 Choices to add years to your life

    Terry Gehlhausen, DO Deaconess Clinic Family Medicine, Oakland City
    People who follow a few simple steps to improve their health have less cancer and heart disease compared to other Americans, and their overall death rate is significantly reduced compared to other people under age 65. Here are ten choices you can make that will lead to a longer and healthier life:

  • Women & Heart Q&A

    Dr. Prasanna Yelamanchili, cardiologist, The Heart Group.
    Dr. Yelamanchili has been practicing in Evansville for more than 5 years, and in that time she has cared for hundreds of women with heart disease. She recently sat down for a Q&A about some important women’s heart health questions.

  • Have a Healthy Heart

    Terry Gehlhausen, DO  Deaconess Clinic Family Medicine, Oakland City
    Heart Disease remains the leading cause of  death in this country, but here are some ideas to help reduce your risk of heart disease and celebrate more Valentine’s Days together with your loved ones.  

  • Knee Osteoarthritis: Living Pain-Free

    Michelle Galen, MD, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic
     
    Our knees do a lot of “heavy lifting” so it’s not surprising that nearly 50% of adults will develop osteoarthritis in the knee by the age of 85.  The human knee consists of three bones (kneecap, tibia and femur) that must move in concert to allow normal range of motion.  The ends of all three bones are covered in cartilage to cushion the joint during movement.  With aging and “wear-and-tear,” the cartilage starts to wear away and the result is painful bone-on-bone friction and/or bone spurs. 

  • HPV and Cervical Cancer

    Kelli Dempsey, AOCNP, Oncology Certified Nurse Practitioner

    January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month. Cervical Cancer is primarily caused by HPV—this stands for Human Papilloma Virus.  Currently, in the United States alone, there are 80 million people infected with HPV. 14 million more become infected each year.

  • COPD: Catching Your Breath

    By James Gutmann, MD  Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic
     
    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a lesser-known respiratory disease but is every bit as dangerous and difficult to manage as asthma.  COPD is an umbrella term for a grouping of specific symptoms that are incurable but manageable with appropriate treatment and lifestyle adjustments.  

  • Episodic Migraines: Treating Migraines Doesn’t Have to be a Headache

    Michelle Galen, MD  Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic
     
    Although migraine symptoms are consistent across classifications, there are two clinical distinctions: Episodic Migraines and Chronic Migraines.  Patients with episodic migraines experience 14 or fewer “headache days” per month whereas chronic migraine sufferers have 15 or more “headache days” per month.  

  • Ragweed Allergy Options for Children: Ease the Sneeze

    Majed Koleilat, MD   Allergy and Immunology, Deaconess Clinic
     
    Ragweed is a pervasive flowering plant that is nearly inescapable and the cause of allergies worldwide.  Allergens and ragweed specifically can be especially dangerous for children.  Allergic symptoms can manifest differently in children, and since children spend more time outside, they are therefore subject to more ragweed exposure.  

  • Small Changes for Gradual Weight Loss and a Healthier Life

    Dr. Lori Sieboldt, Bariatrician; Carolyn Burns, Dietitian; Sarah Bishop and Jennifer Knight, Exercise Specialists, all from Deaconess Weight Loss Solutions

    Weight loss is a common topic this time of year, but the best-laid plans for New Year’s resolutions can go by the wayside if you try to take on too much at once!  There are several small changes to your nutrition and physical activity to implement over the coming days, weeks and even months to help you reach your weight loss goals

  • Big Boo-Boos – How to Know When Your Child’s Injury Needs Medical Attention

    Dr. Taniza Karim, Pediatrician, Deaconess Clinic Boonville

    Bumps and bruises, bangs and scrapes are all part of being a child.  But as children play, sometimes more serious injuries can happen, and parents have to decide if a trip to the doctor, urgent care or emergency room is needed.

  • Staying Safe In Cold Weather

    Dr. Jung Smith, Family Medicine  Deaconess Clinic Mary Street
     
    Frostbite, hypothermia, overexertion and falls are the most common cold-weather health hazards. Below are important tips and information for staying safe this winter.
     

  • Feeling the Burn? It May Be GERD

    Dr. Christi Pagett, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic West
    Sometimes heartburn is more than just a reaction to greasy or spicy foods.  It can be a symptom of a chronic condition called GERD, gastroesophageal reflux disease.  GERD is a condition where there is a back-flow of stomach contents (including stomach acid) into the esophagus.  

  • Advances in Wound Care

    Dr. Brandt Dodson, Podiatrist, Deaconess Wound Services
     
    Wound care is one of the most exciting and rapidly growing subspecialties of medicine.  The increase in knowledge and the addition of new technologies are a significant reason for this growth. 
    Some of the new treatment options are relatively simple while others are more complex.

  • Five Tips for Staying Healthy During the Holidays

    Sarah Perdue, The Women's Hospital 

    Staying healthy during the holidays is never easy. Here are 5 ways to make it through the holidays and stay healthy.

  • Making the Most of Your Pharmacy

    Tom Fite, lead pharmacist of the Deaconess Family Pharmacy 
     
    Most people encounter a pharmacy on a regular basis.  And I find that many patients want to just pay for their medication and go, but they’re missing out on important information. Below, I will detail some “insider tips” that will help you make the most from your pharmacy.
     

  • Cold or Flu - What To Do?

    Dr. Carla Essling, Family Medicine Physician, Deaconess Clinic Gateway Professional Building  
    Cold symptoms are usually milder in nature than those of the flu—but can make you pretty miserable. Cold symptoms also start more gradually than flu symptoms. 

  • Health Benefits of Tai Chi

    John Hufstedler, Deaconess Cross Pointe social work therapist and tai chi instructor
     
    Tai chi—you’ve probably heard of it and even seen it before, but you may not know exactly what it is. 
     

  • Feel Better

    By Terry Gehlhausen, MD  Deaconess Clinic Family Medicine, Oakland City
    Feel better in a year, month, day, even minute! These are simple tips that can lead to increased health and improve your quality of life. 

  • Holidays and Stress

    Sarah Kluender, LCSW

    Holidays are supposed to be a great fun time filled with comfort & joy...holly jolly feel good time.  Those dealing with depression or anxiety may not experience it that way.  The holidays can bring on more difficulty for already stressed out people with the expectation to do more and more things when already feeling bad. 

  • A Doctor’s Perspective on Managing Type II Diabetes—for Herself and Her Patients

    Dr. Leslie Strouse, Internal Medicine 
      
    Type II diabetes is an increasingly-common condition here in the Tri-State, with as many as 1 in 9 older adults having the disease. I have been managing my own diabetes for more than a decade now. So as both a physician and patient with the condition, I have a unique perspective on what it means to manage diabetes.

  • Caregiving Resources

    Wendi Tingley, Home Care Manager, and Andrea Walker, Hospice Manager, Deaconess VNA Home Care & Hospice

    Caregiving is an increasingly-common role in America. Seniors are living longer, and often there are family members and friends who are helping to look out for their well-being.

  • Understanding Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Chandrashekar Kumbar, MD, FACC, The Heart Group
    In my 12 years here at The Heart Group, I’ve cared for many patients who have experienced sudden cardiac arrest; I’ve also heard many stories of those who did not survive sudden cardiac arrest. October is Sudden Cardiac Awareness Month, and so The Heart Hospital and the Deaconess Foundation are working to raise awareness of sudden cardiac arrest, and also are working to place AEDs throughout our communities.
     

  • Autumn: A Time for Change

    Terry Gehlhausen, DO Family Medicine Deaconess Clinic Oakland City
    The winds of autumn are upon us, and they have already blown away the heat and humidity of summer. September 23rd was the first day of autumn and it is time for a new season. 

  • Tips for Aging Healthier & Happier

    Becky Richardville, MSW, LCSW, Care Coordinator at Deaconess Primary Care for Seniors
    Growing older is a privilege, but let’s face it—aging definitely brings about changes in our bodies and minds.

  • All About Head Lice

    Dr. Nancy Grauso-Eby, Deaconess Clinic Pediatrician
    Anyone can get head lice.  Head lice are most common in preschool- and elementary school-aged children. It doesn’t matter how clean your home or hair may be.  It doesn’t matter where children and families live, play and work. 

  • Shingles

    Dr. James Gutmann, Family Medicine Physician at Deaconess Clinic Mt. Pleasant
    In my 26 years of practicing family medicine, I have treated hundreds of patients with shingles and seen how painful and debilitating it can be. My goal in writing this article is to help people either learn how to potentially avoid shingles, OR help them know what to do if they get shingles. 

  • Pelvic Pain

    Dr. Francis McDonnell, and Brittany Fulcher, NP, of the Deaconess Comprehensive Pain Centers
    Pelvic pain, especially among women, is a common condition that can significantly impact the quality of your life. Pelvic pain has numerous causes, which also means that there are numerous treatments available, depending on the cause and type of pain. 

  • Clean Eating in the Summer

    Dr. Emily Krajec, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Princeton
    Summer months naturally lend themselves to clean eating. It’s important to know how to take advantage of this. Summer also brings cookouts, traveling, and family vacations. It is possible to continue clean eating by remembering a few tips and tricks. 

  • Managing Fall Allergy Season

    Jason White, MD Deaconess Clinic Allergy & Immunology

    As we head into the autumn season, people who haven’t had any sneezes and sniffles all year may begin to experience allergies.  

  • Single out Shingles: New Medical Advances for Combating Shingles

    Dr. James Gutman, Family Medicine Deaconess Clinic
    Chickenpox are nearly a childhood rite of passage…  Quarantine from others, being doused in calamine lotion and strong inclinations to take a hairbrush to those itchy miserable lesions.  The varicella virus (or chickenpox) primes patients to develop herpes zoster later on in life.

  • Understanding Your Thyroid

    Dr. Hisham Allababidi, Deaconess Clinic Endocrinologist  
    As an endocrinologist, I help manage issues related to hormones in the body. I see many patients with thyroid disorders, which can lead to a variety of health issues

  • Healthy Golf Facts

    Do you like to golf? Golf is a great low-risk injury sport for all ages. Here are a few healthy golf facts for you to know next time you're out on the course.

  • Who Decides, and When? - Understanding Advance Directives.

    Peggy Matacale, Chaplain, Deaconess Religious Life, and Candace Foster, Deaconess Privacy Officer

    Here at Deaconess, patients and family members are making decisions on others’ behalf every single day.  Sometimes the situation is sudden, such as after a car crash.  In other situations, a family member has been in a gradual decline. But in all circumstances it can be a difficult time, so having the right information, with the desired decision-makers, is very important.

  • Protecting Your Family From Bug Bites

    Dr. Nancy Grauso-Eby, Pediatrician, Deaconess Clinic West
    Summer time means being outside.  And sometimes, that means that insects think that we’re delicious, and begin to bite.
     Fortunately, most bites by mosquitos, flies, fleas and even ticks do NOT cause disease. That being said, the best thing to do for your kids and yourself is to try to prevent the bite in the first place.

  • Love the Skin You’re In: Four Ways to Combat Psoriasis

    Clay Davis, MD Dermatologist, Deaconess Clinic 

    Psoriasis isn’t just an annoying skin condition – it can be a lifelong issue that requires constant management, supervision and treatment.  Psoriasis sufferers experience an accelerated skin cell cycle resulting in scaly patches that are typically dry, itchy and painful.  Psoriasis can affect the nails, scalp and areas with sensitive skin like the underarms.  

  • Lyme Disease

    Terry Gehlhausen, DO  Deaconess Clinic, Oakland City
    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness in the United States.  More than 100,000 cases have been reported since the disease was first discovered in 1982.  The disease is spread by the bite of a deer tick.

  • Diabetes: Let's Get Serious

    Dr. Errin Weisman, Deaconess Clinic Family Medicine 
    What disease can rob you of your vision, freeze up your GI tract, steal your sense of touch, obliterate your kidneys and wreak havoc on your blood vessels causing strokes or heart attacks? DIABETES

  • Father's Day

    Dr. Ron Pyle, Neonatologist at The Women's Hospital
    A day to remember for some, a day to reflect for others and hopefully a day to celebrate all our fathers and what they mean to us. For me, it is a day to say thank you to my hero, my role model, my father. It is also a day to measure how I’m doing as a Dad.
     

  • Top 20 Water Safety Tips for Children

    Dr. Taniza Karim, Deaconess Clinic Pediatrician 
    While enjoying the water is a memorable part of summer, water is one of the most ominous hazards your child will encounter. Young children can drown in only a few inches of water, even if they’ve had swimming instruction.  For youngsters in middle childhood, drowning ranks behind only motor-vehicle accidents as the leading cause of death.

  • Sun Safety Tips for Children

    Dr. Taniza Karim, Deaconess Clinic Pediatrician 
    Summer brings warmer weather and lots of opportunities for outdoor activities. With the fun also comes the risk of sunburns and skin damage. Follow these tips for a healthy and fun summer.

  • Child Summer Safety Tips

    Dr. Taniza Karim, Deaconess Clinic Pediatrician 
    The summer months are a special time during childhood.  Outdoor activities, vacations, camps, etc. all lead to lifelong memories. Discover the top ways to keep your children safe this summer and what habits to encourage (and avoid) during this long break from school.

  • A New Life Through Weight Loss Surgery

    My name is Sandy, and I am a gastric bypass patient of Deaconess Weight Loss Solutions. I underwent surgery in September 2014 and am 116 pounds lighter than I was a year ago!  I’m so excited to share my story. If I can help and inspire someone in the same way that I’ve been inspired by this process and the staff at Deaconess Weight Loss Solutions, then I’ll have made a difference.

  • Clogged Arteries

    H. Simon Tran, MD, RVT - Vascular Surgeon with The Heart Group

    Clogged arteries are the result of plaque buildup on the smooth, inner walls of the vessel. Plaque in the arteries is made up of cholesterol, calcium and blood clots. Buildup takes place over time, but due to various factors, including diet, lifestyle habits, high blood pressure, tobacco smoking and even genetics, it can happen at a faster rate and a younger age.

  • Atrial Fibrillation - causes, symptoms and treatment

    Chandra Kumbar, MD, The Heart Group, Electrophysiologist​

    Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) is a serious heart condition where an irregular, often rapid, heart rate commonly causes poor blood flow in the heart, which can significantly increase the risk of stroke and heart problems.   

  • Heave Those Hives: Five Ways to Combat the Itch

    Majed Koleilat, MD  Allergy/Immunology, Pediatric Allergy/Immunology

    Those tingling red swollen bumps that you may mistake for mosquito bites might just be urticaria (hives). Characterized by sudden itchy red bumps that change shape and turn white if pressed (called blanching), hives are uncomfortable, annoying and troublesome.    

  • 7 Reasons to Shop at Your Local Farmers Market

    Rebekah Basham, PA Deaconess Clinic 
    It's spring again, and that means it's time for local Farmers Markets to open. They have become very popular in past years, but did you know there's health benefits to frequenting a Farmers Market near you? 

  • The Learning Curve: Youth Baseball Pitching Guidelines & Perspectives

    C.J. Barnard, PT, DPT, SCS, CSCS Physical Therapist and Site Coordinator for Progressive Health at Deaconess
    Youth baseball injuries are increasing at an alarming rate despite a growing knowledge of how injuries occur.  Several reasons for this increased injury rate have been postulated (i.e. throwing curveballs too young, inadequate and/or incorrect instruction, sport specialization, etc.), but when you dig into the data, there seems to be a simple, overwhelming reason why youth pitchers are getting injured – OVERUSE. 
     

  • Managing Spring Allergies

    Anne McLaughlin, MD Deaconess Clinic Allergist 

    Does this spring find you sneezing, sniffling and itching?  You’re in good company right now, in large part due to the high tree pollen counts.  This year’s allergy season is a little bit late due to the cold winter; however, once it started, it hit suddenly and hard.

  • Eating Clean, Feeling Good

    Dr. Emily Krajec, Deaconess Clinic Family Medicine 
    Do you feel like food controls you? Are you looking for a solution to weight issues or to your overall health? Are you exercising but not seeing or feeling the results you want?  If so, I want to share with you about eating clean. 

  • Ditch the Itch! New Treatments for Eczema

    Clay Davis, MD, Dermatology Deaconess Clinic

    Atopic dermatitis, or eczema, is often a chronic skin condition that can have a significant impact on quality of life.  The condition is characterized by an itchy pink, dry rash that often leads to cycles of itching and scratching that are hard to break. 

  • Don’t Let Uterine Fibroids Limit Your Life

    Constantine Scordalakes, MD, Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Up to 25% of women have uterine fibroids but many are unaware because they often can occur without symptoms.  However, uterine fibroids can cause a myriad of symptoms including but not limited to constipation, frequent urination, heavy menstrual bleeding or prolonged menstrual periods, pain or pressure in the pelvic region, backache or difficulty emptying the bladder.  

  • Sandal Season: Getting Your Toes in Tip-Top Shape

    Brandt Dodson, DPM Deaconess Clinic Podiatrist             
    Advertisements begin every summer for the new swimsuit fashions.  But what about sandal season?  For many, warm weather creates an uncomfortable notion of displaying nails that are yellow and thickened from the ravages of nail fungus.  Nail fungus, or onychomycosis, can affect up to 18% of the population. Some estimates suggest that nearly one quarter of adults will develop nail fungus by age 40 and the incidence increases with age.  Nearly half of seniors will be diagnosed with toenail fungus.  
     

  • Influencing Influenza – Is It Possible?

    Michelle Galen, MD Deaconess Clinic Family Medicine 
    Every year, parents, school nurses and physicians dread flu season.  For most, influenza is an inconvenience characterized by missed work, a trip to the drug store and hours of daytime television.  However, for others, influenza can be deadly.  According to The World Health Organization, up to 500,000 people die every year from the flu.  

  • 10 Choices to Add Years to Your Life

    Terry Gehlhausen, DO Deaconess Clinic Family Medicine
    People who follow a few simple steps to improve their health have less cancer and heart disease compared to other Americans, and their overall death rate is significantly reduced compared to other people under age 65. Here are ten choices you can make that will lead to a longer and healthier life:

  • All About Water

    Rebekah Basham, PA Deaconess Clinic
    We’ve all heard how important it is to drink water, but how much is the right amount? What about caffeine, sports drinks, and weight loss? With all the information floating around, it’s time to get the facts on your water intake. 

  • Preventing Cancer - Lifestyle Factors That Reduce Your Risk

    Dr. Devi Kodali, Deaconess Clinic Oncologist/Hematologist 

    The thought of cancer can be concerning. Learn what lifestyle factors play key roles in cancer development and what you can do to lower your overall cancer risk.

  • The Women's Hospital and Project Reveal

    Project Reveal and The Women’s Hospital have partnered together to bring a local television series to women in Evansville and surrounding communities. The series will be documentary-style and feature real women and their stories. The goal of Project Reveal is to be real, inspiring, creative and diverse. The series will launch in the Spring and air in varied time slots on WNIN and WEVV. 

  • Preventing Cancer - 4 Specific Types

    Dr. Maqbool Ahmed, Deaconess Clinic Oncologist/Hematologist

    According to recent studies, it’s believed that up to 1/3 of cancers can be prevented through specific actions and lifestyle modifications. Learn what the four most preventable cancers are and what you can do to lower your risk.

  • Fight the Mites! Six Medical Advances to Beat Dust Mite Allergies

    Majed Koleilat, MD  Allergy/Immunology, Pediatric Allergy/Immunology 
    According to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, dust mites are the single most common cause of household allergies…provoking sneezing, runny or stuffy noses, and itchy or watery eyes. Most people with this allergy aren’t allergic to dust particles, but to tiny animals called dust mites.  

  • 10 Good-for-You Date Ideas

    With Valentine’s Day just around the corner, you may be scrambling to come up with a great date idea. While the old standbys of flowers and chocolate are always popular, it may be time to spice things up a bit and think outside-the-box with some healthy date alternatives. Here are some date ideas to get you and your special someone active and healthy. 

  • Can the new weight loss drugs really help you lose weight?

    Dr. Mark Graves, Deaconess Clinic Internal Medicine
    According to the CDC, more than one third of American adults are obese.  Since the obesity epidemic began, Americans have tried an endless amount of techniques to drop extra pounds.  From group meetings to home delivered meals to medically supervised weight loss, the battle of the bulge has yet to be conquered.  The onslaught of programs, clinics and plans has left us confused and, more importantly, still obese.  

  • 8 Steps to Living Heart Healthy

    Terry Gehlhausen, DO, Deaconess Clinic Family Medicine
    Heart Disease is the leading cause of death in this country.  Here are some suggestions to reduce your risk of heart disease so you can celebrate more Valentine’s Days together with your loved ones.

  • Easy Ways to Cut Calories

    Terry Gehlausen, DO Deaconess Clinic Family Medicine
    Most of us picked up a little extra fat around the middle over the holidays. Here are a few simple ways to eliminate those pounds:

  • When To See a Doctor vs. Treat at Home

    Dr. Greg Rodocker, Deaconess Clinic Family Medicine
    Deciding when to see a doctor, whether for your own, a family member or a child’s illness, can be a difficult decision.   You know that sometimes a “virus is just a virus,” and that you just need to rest, drink lots of fluids, and give it a few days. But sometimes an illness needs treatment, whether through antibiotics or other medications and symptom care.

  • The Well-Stocked Medicine Cabinet

    Dr. Jung Smith, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic 
    I think it’s wise to have a stash of basic medications for everyone in the family, so I want to share information about various over-the-counter medications, to help you decide what you should have in YOUR well-stocked medicine cabinet.

  • How to Make Realistic Resolutions and Keep Them

    Deaconess Employee Wellness staff.
    A new year can mean new resolutions, but what’s the best way to set realistic goals you can actually accomplish? Read on for some useful tips and direction to keep your resolutions, reach your goals, and have a new year that’s happy and healthy. 

  • Deaconess Wound Services - a Physician’s Perspective

    Brandt Dodson, DPM
    Chronic non-healing wounds are a daily fact of life for many.  Whether they result in lost wages, prolonged hospitalization or the loss of a limb, these wounds can be as life-altering as they are costly. Deaconess Wound Services addresses this problem with the most advanced techniques available.

  • Your Diet and Your Hearing

    Ann B. Raibley, Certified Clinical Audiologist
    Protecting your ears from hazardous noise and keeping ear infections at bay are fundamental ways to minimize hearing loss. However, a healthy lifestyle with exercise and a balanced diet can also help maintain hearing health.

  • Managing Holiday Stress

    Janie Chappell, Deaconess Cross Pointe

    Stress and depression can make your holiday miserable. It’s common, particularly among women who are always feeling that they need to be “everything to everyone.” As a result, we neglect our own emotional and even physical well-being. Here are some tips on how to prevent and deal with stress and depression over the holidays.
     
     

  • Alcohol and Seniors

    Dr. Errin Weisman,  Family Medicine

    When does drinking become a problem? The aging population is not immune to alcohol abuse.  For men and women 65 years of age or older, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse considers one drink per day to be the maximum amount for “moderate” alcohol use. 

  • Reality Check Time - Today is a new day!

    By Dr. Errin Weisman
    Ever get in a rut and seem stuck? Women often feel pounded down to the ground to the point that they can’t muscle the energy to get up. Their spirits are weary and souls tarnished.  Drained women, worn-out moms, and fading ladies sometimes need a good restart. Learn quick tips to revitalize, rejuvenate, renew, and refresh you.

  • 9 Tips for Making Healthy Choices During the Holidays

    From Deaconess Wellness Team

    Family dinners and holiday parties are just around the corner. If you don’t have a plan for balancing food choices with enjoying the festivities, you may find yourself really frustrated. Try these 9 tips for making healthy holiday choices and you may find yourself having a Happy New Year

  • Preparing For Your Cancer Journey

    Mary Gaffney, RN, Nurse Navigator, Deaconess Cancer Services

    Learning that you or someone you love has cancer is a life-changing moment. After hearing the word “cancer,” people are often overwhelmed, anxious and fearful.  You may feel paralyzed and numb, not knowing what to do next. There are many aspects to preparing for your cancer journey—medical, financial, physical, and emotional.  

  • 6 Tips to Keep You Fit This Fall

    By: Dr Terry Gehlhausen, Deaconess Clinic Petersburg

    The winds of autumn are upon us, and they have already blown away the heat and humidity of summer. It's time to prepare for a new season, and the same applies to your health.

  • All About Influenza

    Dr. Erin Weisman, Deaconess Clinic Petersburg

    We are nearing Influenza “flu” season again. The ideal time to get immunized is before flu viruses start circulating. It takes approximately 2 weeks for your body to process the vaccine and make an effective number of antibodies, so getting vaccinated before the flu hits is key. While seasonal flu outbreaks may occur as early as October, most years we see a peak in January or later.

  • Breast Cancer Resources for Tri-State Women

    Kathy Dockery, Director of the Deaconess Breast Center

    Kathy Dockery, Director of the Deaconess Breast Center and Sally Britt, Community Outreach Coordinator for Susan G. Komen for the Cure, Evansville/Tri-State affiliate talk about resources for women with breast cancer.

  • Fall Prevention

    Kim Childers, MSW, LSW Care Coordinator at Deaconess Primary Care for Seniors

    Complications due to falls are the leading cause of death from injury in seniors age 65 and older. Prevention of falls in the home is so important. You’re protecting someone’s vitality, independence and life. 

  • Confronting Misinformation on the Web

    Errin Weisman, DO, Family Medicine Deaconess Clinic Petersburg

    How many of you have jumped on the web, google searched your condition, symptoms, etc. Then spent the next few hours reading about how you probably have the worst diagnosis possible on WebMD  and the like. 

  • Medicare 101 - Part One Two

    Scott Burke, Deaconess Mature Health Center and Shirley Powers, Deaconess Senior Services/Helping Hand Specialist 

    There is a lot of confusion related to Medicare and Medicare supplement plans. This two part series answers several of the questions you or your family members might have.

  • Medicare 101 - Part One

    Scott Burke, Deaconess Mature Health Center and Shirley Powers, Deaconess Senior Services/Helping Hand Specialist 

    There is a lot of confusion related to Medicare and Medicare supplement plans. This two part series answers several of the questions you or your family members might have.

  • New Allergy Treatment: Sublingual Immunotherapy

    Dr. Majed Koleilat, Allergist at Deaconess Clinic

    Allergy season is in full swing.  Most of the tree allergy season is past, but now people who are allergic to grasses are starting to suffer. The options to treat allergies--for decades—have been the use of antihistamine medications and intranasal steroids/antihistamines to help reduce symptoms, as well as allergy shots (immunotherapy) which help your body stop reacting to allergens.

  • Medical Weight Loss, Polly's Story

    Like so many people, Polly struggled with my weight for years, trying many diets only to lose some weight and regain it, and more.  At her heaviest, she actually weighed over 300 pounds. 

  • Vaccinating Your Child

    Errin Weisman, DO, Family Medicine Deaconess Clinic Petersburg

    Vaccinations.  They’re considered to be one of the biggest, most important medical advancements ever made against the spread of infectious disease.  They save lives and prevent so much suffering. But what do you really know about vaccines?
     

  • 7 Guidelines to Healthy Weight Loss

    Dr. Terry Gehlhausen, Family Medicine Deaconess Clinic Oakland City

    Dietary changes will reduce your risk of breast, colon, and prostate cancers, and also reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease by up to 80%! Read this blog for seven “guidelines” to give your body a “tune up.”

  • Back to School for College Students

    University of Southern Indiana - University Health Center Staff

    Young adults heading to college—or back to college—have unique health needs such as diet, sleep, exercise, illnesses, stress, mental health and immunizations/testing. 

  • Understanding ADHD

    Pam Pepper, MSN, Clinical Nurse Specialist with Deaconess Cross Pointe

    ADHD is a common condition, but is often misunderstood. Currently, it’s believed 9% of children ages 3-17 and 2-4% of adults have ADHD. 

  • 4 Steps to Safe Backpack Use

    Whether it’s back to school time for your child, or you’re planning a long hike, check out these helpful tips to ensure you know how to safely wear a backpack and promote good posture and spinal health. 

  • No Bubble Gum Medicine Today

    Dr. Errin Weisman, Family Medicine
    Doctors are now writing fewer prescriptions for antibiotics for young children. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) recommend an end to routine antibiotic prescriptions. 

  • Back to School Tips

    Dr. Dolly Marx, Deaconess Clinic - West Pediatrician

    It’s back-to-school time, which means it’s a great time for some back-to-school tips from a Deaconess Clinic pediatrician. Learn more about getting into a routine, helping your child sleep at night, and school-smart nutrition.

  • School Physicals and Getting Back to School Routine

    Dr. Nancy Grauso-Eby

    If your child is just beginning school, they will definitely need a physical and proof of immunizations prior to attending. 

  • Summer Safety Tips

    Tammy Hargett, FNP-C, Deaconess Clinic Mt. Pleasant Family Practitioner

    If you have kids, you’re likely dealing with some safety worries associated with summer activities. 
    Here are some tips to help your family have a safe and fun summer. 

  • Visiting the Hospital with Parkinson's: Time Well Spent

    By Karen Smith

    When facing life with a chronic, progressive disease such as Parkinson’s disease (PD), how you choose to spend your time takes on even greater importance.  This is what I learned when I was diagnosed with young onset PD in 2001, and afterwards while striving to ‘maintain’ my quality of life.

  • Weekend Warrior to Total Knee

    Dr. Gary Moore, MD, Sports Medicine, Total Joint Replacement, General Orthopaedics

    The normal human knee will tolerate the stresses of life – walking, lifting, running, sports, even extreme sports without wearing out enough to ever require a total joint; but, not every knee is normal.  There are many circumstances that cause a knee to wear out and get osteoarthritis.  Plus, the life expectancy in the year 1900 was about 50 – now it is in to the late 80’s; so, we have over 30 extra years to get osteoarthritis.

  • Clearing Up the Question about Hip Fractures: When to Replace, When to Fix.

    Dr. Dennis Beck, Jr., MD, Trauma, Total Joint Replacement, General Orthopaedics

    Hip fractures in the United States represent an epidemic of disease.  As of 2003, there were 2.25 million hip fractures in the world.  Hip fractures are increasing at a rate of approximately 8% every year due to the population aging and increased activity of our seniors and the community.

  • Defining Arthritis

    Arthritis is a very common condition, affecting as many as half of all Americans in their lifetime. In my more than 20 years of practice, I’ve seen thousands of patients who are suffering from arthritis. It can be a painful and debilitating disease. However, arthritis is a broad term that describes one of several conditions.

  • What You Need to Know About Heroin

    Donna Lilly, Chemical Dependency Coordinator at Deaconess Cross Pointe

    Heroin use is on the rise in our area and many towns across the United States because heroin is a cheaper alternative for people who are addicted to or are abusing prescription painkillers. These painkillers are becoming harder to get, and are therefore becoming very expensive if obtained illegally

  • Health Screenings Men Need - When & Why

    Dr. Paul Siami

    Health screenings help doctors and other providers detect conditions at earlier, more treatable stages.  Whether we’re screening for blood glucose (for diabetes), cholesterol (for heart disease) or PSA (for prostate cancer), the goal of all screenings is to bring attention to a problem or a developing problem.

  • Surviving Allergy Season

    Dr. Jason White, Deaconess Clinic Allergy & Immunology​

    If you are prone to seasonal allergies, there are some things you can do to help reduce your suffering. 

  • Cervical Cancer Screening and the HPV Vaccine

    Dr. Lauren Veazey, Family Practice Physician at Deaconess Clinic Mt. Pleasant.

    We’ve come a long way with cervical cancer.  Cervical cancer used to be the number one cancer killer of American women.  That number has gone down in recent years due to improved screening methods, but there are still improvements to be made.

  • Lifestyle Changes That Lead to a Leaner, Healthier You

    Ashley Chipps, BS, Wellness Coach with Deaconess Employee Wellness Program​

    I want to help anyone reading this know more about how eating habits and activity levels can impact weight loss. The first point to make, which is what the rest of this conversation will be about, is that weight loss is a matter of taking in fewer calories than you use during the day. 

  • Stroke. Reduce Your Risk, and Know the Signs

    From Deaconess Primary Stroke Center Staff

    Stroke is the leading cause of long-term adult disability and the fifth leading cause of death in the United States. Because of these serious statistics, we want everyone to know more about stroke risk factors, stroke signs and symptoms, and the importance of immediate treatment if a stroke is suspected.

  • Q&A About Getting Your Zzzzs

    Dee Summers, RRT, RST, RPSGT, Deaconess Sleep Center

    Are you sleepy right now? Feeling like you didn’t get a good night’s sleep last night? Read this Q & A to learn about sleep disorders and treatment options.

  • Shingles - Painful and Preventable. Patient & Physician Perspectives Part 1

    Shingles: A Patient’s Perspective – Part One
    Many people don’t know that about one in three people in the US will develop shingles during their lifetime, and older people are at the greatest risk for developing shingles. In fact, half of all people who live to age 85 will develop shingles at some point.

  • Are You at Risk for Lung Cancer?

    Mary Gaffney, RN and Nurse Navigator at the Chancellor Center for Oncology​

    According to the American Cancer Society, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women. Each year, more people die of lung cancer than of colon, breast, and prostate cancers combined.  An annual test for lung cancer intended for long-term smokers (Low dose CT) is now offered by Deaconess Hospital and can help detect lung cancer at its earliest, most-treatable stages.

  • Ear Infections in Children

    Dr. Jung Smith, Family Medicine Physician

    Did you know that more than three out of four children will have at least one ear infection by their third birthday? In fact, according to UpToDate, between 60-80% of children have at least one ear infection by their first birthday, and 80-90% will by 2-3 years old. 

  • What Women Need to Know About Their Heart Health

    Dr. Prasanna Yelamanchili, Cardiologist, The Heart Group​

    Women sometimes think that they aren’t at risk for heart disease, but that simply isn’t true. More women die of heart disease and stroke than all cancers combined. One in four women die of heart-related problems compared to 1 in 30 by breast cancer.  Also, 2/3 of women who die of a heart attack had no prior symptoms of heart disease, and women die twice as often after a heart attack as compared to men.

  • Are You Ready to Take Shape for Life?

    Take Shape for Life is a new program at Deaconess Weight Loss Solutions.  This is an effective, relatively-easy way for people to lose weight—in a non-surgical program. Many people don’t qualify for or NEED weight loss surgery, but instead would benefit from a medically-directed weight loss program.

  • What You Need to Know About Colon Cancer

    Dr. Chris Braden, Deaconess Clinic Oncologist​

    More than 143,000 new colorectal (colon and rectum) cancer cases are diagnosed in the US each year, and 52,000 Americans die each year from the disease. Colon cancer is responsible for 9% of all cancer deaths, and it is the most commonly occurring cancer in both men and women after lung cancer according to the National Cancer Institute.
     

  • Diabetes 101

    Jane Hackert, Certified Diabetes Educator, Deaconess Diabetes Center​

    Diabetes is a serious condition that is becoming more and more common. Diabetes, which is marked by elevated blood glucose and the body’s inability to use that blood glucose, affects more than 25.8 million people in the U.S., about 8.3% of the population.

  • Men's Cancers & the Importance of Early Detection

    Dr. Joseph Klink, Deaconess Clinic Urology/Oncologist

    There are two cancers that are exclusive to men—prostate and testicular cancers.  Like all cancers, catching them early means the best chance of a good prognosis.
     

  • A Breast Cancer Story: From a Patient and Patient Navigator Perspective

    Patient – Leigh Ann
    Nurse Navigator – Robynn Working, Breast Patient


    In August 2012, I found a lump. I was only 42, so breast cancer wasn’t something I’d really thought about. I had no family history so I didn’t really worry about breast cancer, to be quite honest.

  • Concussion Questions & Answers

    Gina Niemeier, PA-C, of the Deaconess Concussion Clinic ​

    The Deaconess Concussion Clinic specializes in the assessment and treatment of concussions.  Through this blog post, I’ll explain what a concussion is, how to tell if you or someone you love has one, what should be done if you have a concussion and some prevention tips.

  • A Doctor's Take on Osteoporosis

    Dr. Becca Hopper, Deaconess Clinic Internist and Pediatrician

    Osteoporosis is a disease in which the density and quality of bone are reduced—bones actually become weaker. As bones become more porous and fragile, the risk of fracture is greatly increased. The loss of bone occurs silently and progressively. Often there are no symptoms until the first fracture occurs.

  • Keeping Your Teen Healthy

    Lauren Veazey, MD, Family Practice Physician

    Calling all (frazzled, busy) parents of teenagers! This article is about keeping your teenagers healthy.  You can get so busy keeping up with your teen’s social/academic/extracurricular lives that it’s easy to forget about keeping them healthy!
     

  • Chronic Pain and the Deaconess Comprehensive Pain Center

    Brittney Fulcher, NP from the Deaconess Comprehensive Pain Center​​
    Tens of millions of Americans suffer from chronic pain. This pain can be mild or excruciating, episodic or continuous, merely inconvenient or totally incapacitating.
    At the Deaconess Comprehensive Pain Center (DCPC), we serve patients with chronic pain caused by a wide variety of medical issues:

  • It's Raining Now! What do you do when someone you love is not doing as well as they used to.

    Content Provided by Deaconess VNA Plus Personal Care Services​

    Realizing that someone you love is not functioning as well at home as they used to can come as a shock; discovering what in-home care costs can be even more surprising, particularly since many people believe that Medicare or traditional health insurance will pay for all types of assistance.

  • Sun Safety for Kids

    Summer is a great time for children to be healthy and active outdoors! However, with the sunny weather comes the risk of sun dangers. Follow these sun safety tips to ensure that you and your kiddos have a fun and safe summer!
     

  • Surgical Weight Loss

    Dr. Christopher Haughn, Bariatric Surgeon at Deaconess Weight Loss Solutions discusses the types of surgical weight loss methods performed at Deaconess. Learn more about:  Gastric bypass, Sleeve gastrectomy and LapBand.

  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome Q&A

    Dr. Kalyana Lavu, Deaconess Clinic Gastroenterologist

    IBS is most common in women, and is most common in women under 50. However, men or women at any age can be diagnosed. It does occur in children, but is far more common in adults.  Some of the most frequently asked questions can be found here.

  • Vaccines and Your Child

    Dr. Nancy Grauso-Eby, Deaconess Clinic Pediatrician​

    Vaccines.  They’re considered one of the greatest medical advancements in history, and can currently prevent 25 illnesses and diseases.  This is a topic that is so important to me and fellow pediatricians, as vaccinations are crucial part of caring for children. In this article, learn more about vaccines, including why they’re important and how they work.

  • What Everyone Should Know About Skin Cancer

    According to the American Academy of Dermatology, it is estimated that one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. People of all races can develop skin cancer. However, certain people are more likely to develop skin cancer. Some skin cancer risk factors include:

  • What you need to know about Prescription Drug Abuse

    Donna Lilly, LCSW, Chemical Dependency Coordinator with Deaconess Cross Pointe

    Did you know that more people abuse prescription drugs than cocaine, heroin, hallucinogens and inhalants combined?  In the U.S., one in 20 people have used prescription painkillers for non-medical reasons. 
    So how does a prescription drug abuse problem start?

  • When You're Feeling More Than "Blue"

    Phil Wuertz, MS, LCSW, LMFT, Deaconess Clinic Behavioral Health​

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a specific kind of depression that affects people seasonally. The vast majority are those who are affected during the colder/darker months. For reasons that aren't fully understood, some people develop depression that is considered to be related to less sunlight.

  • Suicide Part II: Addressing Warning Signs

    Jeanne Kirk, Deaconess Cross Pointe

    In part one, I discussed some of the warning signs that someone may be considering suicide.  Now that you know warning signs, what should you do if you realize someone you care about is exhibiting them?
    Believe it or not, the single best thing you can do is ASK THEM about it; however, there are good and bad ways to do this.

  • Suicide Part 1: Recognizing Warning Signs

    Jeanne Kirk, Deaconess Cross Pointe

    Suicide is a leading cause of death in American teenagers, and the rate of suicide in middle aged adults has gone up more than 30% in the past decade.  Everyone should be aware of the warning signs of suicide, and what you can do if you’re worried about someone you love.  Most people give a sign or signal of some type—the key is to recognize it. 

  • Pain Management Q&A

    Marjorie Oropilla, MD, Deaconess Comprehensive Pain Centers
    When someone is in pain, it affects every aspect of their life, and can lead to many questions about how to address pain.  Below, I’ve provided answers to some of the most common questions I receive as a pain management specialist.
     

  • Kidney Stones, Part 2

    Dr. Paul Siami, Deaconess Clinic Urologist
    If you’ve ever had kidney stones, you know how painful the condition can be.  My previous article talked about the causes and symptoms of kidney stones, as well as the process of sometimes letting a stone “pass.”  This second article focuses on procedures used to treat kidney stones, and how to prevent stones from occurring or reoccurring.

  • Kidney Stones, Part 1

    Dr. Paul Siami, Deaconess Clinic Urologist

    If you’ve ever had a kidney stone, you know how extraordinary the pain can be. I’ve had female patients who have given birth tell me that having and passing a kidney stone is worse than childbirth—without the reward at the end!
     

  • Caring for Active Feet

    Dr. Jason Denton, Deaconess Clinic Podiatry​
    Welcome runners!  This article is all about keeping YOUR feet healthy and feeling good. Not only am I a podiatrist, but I’m also an avid runner. I’ve been a runner for about 6-7 years, since I started in podiatry school.  I lost about 100 pounds before I started running, and so I took up running to keep it off. The first timed race I ever did was the Des Moines (Iowa) Half Marathon. I’ve ran numerous races since then—4 full marathons, 3 ultra marathons (50k, 50 mile), and numerous half marathons. I’m sharing some helpful tips—both personal and professional--about keeping your feet healthy.

  • Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Asthma

    Julie Morgan, RRT, AE-C, Deaconess Respiratory Services Education Coordinator​
    Get the basic explanations of COPD and asthma; understand how they can be prevented, diagnosed and treated; and get tips on managing both conditions—particularly in the winter.

  • All About Exercise for Kids!

    Kids exercise all the time without even knowing it. Running around outside or playing kickball at school, are two kinds of exercise. When you exercise, you are helping build a strong body that will be able to move around and do all the stuff you need to do. 

  • Be a Fit Kid!

    There is a lot of discussion these days about fit kids. People who care for kids, like parents, doctors, health care professionals, and teachers, want to help kids be fit and healthy. Being fit is a way of saying a person eats well, gets a lot of exercise, and has a healthy weight. If you are fit, your body works well, feels good, and looks healthy. When you are fit, you can do all the things you want to do, like run and play with your family and friends. 

  • Joint Replacement Q & A - What to Expect

    When someone is considering joint replacement, many questions come to mind about what to expect from the overall process—before surgery, during the hospital stay, and afterwards. Each year, Deaconess performs more than 800 joint replacement surgeries. The majority of those are hip and knee replacements, but we also offer shoulder replacements as well. Because joint issues are so common, lots of people have probably had the same questions you do.

  • Reducing Anxiety About Anxiety

    Janie Chappell, RN, MSN, Deaconess Cross Pointe

    Affecting nearly one-in-five adults at some level, anxiety disorders are common and can be debilitating. Anxiety disorders can range from mild to severe to full panic.  Some people don’t realize they have an anxiety disorder until they end up in an emergency room thinking they’re having a heart attack, when they’re actually having a panic/anxiety attack.
     

  • Sleep Safety for Babies

    Keeping your baby safe is a top priority for parents. Here are some guidelines to help you maintain baby’s safety at night and during nap times. 

  • Get a Vasectomy, Be Her Hero

    Dr. Paul Siami, Deaconess Clinic Urology​
    Once a couple has decided that their family is complete, or a man simply knows that he doesn’t want future children, vasectomy is an option to consider. Vasectomy is highly effective and is covered by insurance.

  • Can You Hear Me Now? 9 Common Questions About Hearing Loss

    Ann Raibley, CCC-A, Deaconess Clinic Audiologist
    Did you know that about 20 percent of adults in the United States report some degree of hearing loss?  By the time people reach age 65, that number rises to 1 in 3.  As an audiologist, there are many common questions I receive about hearing loss, so I want to share those—and their answers—with you.

  • Be Smart About Medications...Especially Around Kids

    Tom Fite, RPh and Manager of the Deaconess Family Pharmacy

    Did you know that medications are the leading cause of child poisoning?  Each year, thousands of children are rushed to emergency rooms due to being accidentally poisoned by medications.
     
    Children are naturally curious about the world around them, so as their caregivers, we must be vigilant about keeping them safe.  People underestimate how clever children can be and how dangerous medication can be for little ones.

  • Be Stroke Smart

    Primary Stroke Center

    We want every person I meet to know three things about stroke:  What causes them, how to prevent them, and how to recognize the signs and symptoms of stroke. Stroke is serious.  It’s the leading cause of long-term adult disability in the US, and it’s one of the leading causes of death.

  • How to Stop Stressing About Stress

    Janie Chappell, RN, MSN, Deaconess Cross Pointe

    We all need some stress to keep us going and motivate us in life, or we won't get anything done! Stress is what makes us get up and perform at work, get the motivation and focus to study for a test, to prepare for a presentation, etc.

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