My Health Articles

  • How To Get A Good Night’s Sleep

    Getting a good night’s sleep is a critical part of living a healthy life.  Sleep is when our bodies repair themselves, and inadequate sleep has been linked to heart disease, stroke, diabetes, weight gain and depression.

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  • Autism: Knowing the Signs and the Importance of Early Intervention

    Sara Dillon, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner, Certified Pediatric Primary Care Mental Health Specialist, Deaconess Riley Children’s Services

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a lifelong developmental disability.  Many people don’t understand autism and the importance of recognizing signs and symptoms in young children so they can get the early help they need.   

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  • Alcohol – the Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    There can be a lot of confusion about alcohol and its effects on your health.  How much alcohol—and what kind—is good for you?  How much is too much?  And when does drinking become a problem?  Two Deaconess experts weigh in. 
     

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  • Managing Spring Allergies

    Dr. Anne McLaughlin, Deaconess Clinic Allergist 
    Does this spring find you sneezing, sniffling and itching?  You’re in good company right now, in large part due to the high tree pollen counts.  

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  • Getting Started with Physical Activity

    Dr. Jung Smith, Family  Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Mary Street
     
    Get Motivated!
     
    If you've not been physically active, you may be wondering how to get started.  For many people, walking offers a great way to become more active. And Deaconess is getting ready to begin our annual Healthier U Walk series—see the schedule and more at www.deaconess.com/walk

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  • Helping Kids Develop Healthy Eating Habits

    Dr. Taniza Karim, Pediatrician, Deaconess Clinic Boonville
    Every day we learn more about the importance of nutrition in the health of children, both now and as they become adults.  And every day, many parents find themselves begging, bartering and bewildered in the face of getting their kids to eat healthy food.
     

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  • Get Screened – It’s Simple and Could Save Your Life

    Dr. Devi Kodali, Deaconess Cancer Services
     
    March is Colon Cancer Awareness Month, so we are working to increase awareness about the importance of colon cancer screening. Did you know that only 4 in 10 cases of colon cancer are diagnosed at early stages?  This is in part due to low screening rates. Deaconess is partnering with the American Cancer Society to help change that.  

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  • Sneezing, runny nose, feeling miserable…is it a cold or allergies?

    Dr. Jason White, Deaconess Clinic Allergist
    “Doc, I’m miserable.  Do I have a cold or allergies?”
    I hear this question a lot.  The last thing anyone wants is a runny nose and constant sneezing to make the winter more drawn out and miserable. While many blame their symptoms on a cold, it could be something much more.

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  • 10 Choices to add years to your life

    Terry Gehlhausen, DO Deaconess Clinic Family Medicine, Oakland City
    People who follow a few simple steps to improve their health have less cancer and heart disease compared to other Americans, and their overall death rate is significantly reduced compared to other people under age 65. Here are ten choices you can make that will lead to a longer and healthier life:

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  • Women & Heart Q&A

    Dr. Prasanna Yelamanchili, cardiologist, The Heart Group.
    Dr. Yelamanchili has been practicing in Evansville for more than 5 years, and in that time she has cared for hundreds of women with heart disease. She recently sat down for a Q&A about some important women’s heart health questions.

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  • Have a Healthy Heart

    Terry Gehlhausen, DO  Deaconess Clinic Family Medicine, Oakland City
    Heart Disease remains the leading cause of  death in this country, but here are some ideas to help reduce your risk of heart disease and celebrate more Valentine’s Days together with your loved ones.  

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  • Knee Osteoarthritis: Living Pain-Free

    Michelle Galen, MD, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic
     
    Our knees do a lot of “heavy lifting” so it’s not surprising that nearly 50% of adults will develop osteoarthritis in the knee by the age of 85.  The human knee consists of three bones (kneecap, tibia and femur) that must move in concert to allow normal range of motion.  The ends of all three bones are covered in cartilage to cushion the joint during movement.  With aging and “wear-and-tear,” the cartilage starts to wear away and the result is painful bone-on-bone friction and/or bone spurs. 

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  • HPV and Cervical Cancer

    Kelli Dempsey, AOCNP, Oncology Certified Nurse Practitioner
    January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month. Cervical Cancer is primarily caused by HPV—this stands for Human Papilloma Virus.  Currently, in the United States alone, there are 80 million people infected with HPV. 14 million more become infected each year.

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  • COPD: Catching Your Breath

    By James Gutmann, MD  Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic
     
    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a lesser-known respiratory disease but is every bit as dangerous and difficult to manage as asthma.  COPD is an umbrella term for a grouping of specific symptoms that are incurable but manageable with appropriate treatment and lifestyle adjustments.  

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  • Episodic Migraines: Treating Migraines Doesn’t Have to be a Headache

    By Michelle Galen, MD  Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic
     
    Although migraine symptoms are consistent across classifications, there are two clinical distinctions: Episodic Migraines and Chronic Migraines.  Patients with episodic migraines experience 14 or fewer “headache days” per month whereas chronic migraine sufferers have 15 or more “headache days” per month.  

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