Skip to main content Skip to home page
  • What is Common Burial Service?

    Donald Simpson, Care Center Manager

    Three times per year, Donald's team partners with The Women's Hospital in Newburgh, Indiana and Alexander Memorial Cemetery to arrange the burial service for parents who have experienced a miscarriage.

  • Pregnancy and Pelvic Health

    Kim Snyder, Physical Therapist, Pelvic Health and Wellness Center at The Women's Hospital

    Let's talk about physical challenges of pregnancy. From conception to the birth of your baby, changes in your body are happening from head to toe. These changes are due to hormone levels adjusting, loosening of ligaments and connective tissue, enlargement of breasts and abdomen, and the growth of your baby fighting your organs for space. As a result of these changes, your body must adapt! During the adjustment periods there are some common symptoms that pregnant women appreciate. Some of these symptoms are normal and some are not. Some of the symptoms we can control on our own and some may need special attention.

  • Diagnosis and Management of PCOS

    Valerie T., NP, Boston IVF at The Women's Hospital

    PCOS is one of the most common or hormonal problems affecting women. It affects 5-18% of women.

  • Find a Class for Everyone in your Growing Family

    Christy H., RN, BSN, Maternal Care Educator at The Women's Hospital

    The Women’s Hospital has classes for everyone, whether you’re expecting your first child or just need a refresher on certain skills. All of our classes are taught by experienced professionals in their area of expertise. Therefore, you are sure to receive the most up-to-date, accurate information on the topics you are most interested in.
     

  • Why is it Important to Know My Family Medical History

    Christine H., Genetic Counselor at Tri State Perinatology

    Knowing one’s family medical history allows a person to take steps to reduce his or her risk. You should address any concerns you have about your family history with your physician or another qualified healthcare professional such as a genetics counselor.

  • Flat Head Syndrome

    Lorien A., MPT, OCS

    Positional Plagiocephaly (Flat Head Syndrome) - How do we help and prevent it?

  • Moms Support Circle

    Rachel Beier, BSN, RNC-OB, Maternal Care Advisor at The Women's Hospital

    Due to hormone changes after pregnancy, it is common to experience feelings of anxiety, sadness, or overwhelmed. The Women’s Hospital would like to assist you in your recovery with Mom’s Support Circle, our free, self-help group.

  • An Infertility Story: Journey to Baby Topper

    Valerie Topper, CNM, Boston IVF at The Women's Hospital

    70 pills, 46 shots, 112 vaginal suppositories, numerous vaginal ultrasounds, and 2 years and 4 month’s time…


     

  • The Facts about Endometriosis

    Daniel Griffin, MD, FACOG, Reproductive Endocrinologist, Boston IVF at The Women's Hospital

    Endometriosis is a common condition in which part of the uterine lining or glands are located outside of the uterus. Typically the glandular tissue is located in the pelvis and abdomen. The most common symptoms of endometriosis are painful menstrual cycles, pain with intercourse, infertility or an ovarian mass. Learn about the most common treatments for Endometriosis.

  • Women and Heart Disease: Pregnancy Induced Heart Failure

    Courtney Hoppenjans,OB and Heart Patient, Deaconess Health System

    Courtney Hoppenjans, OB and Heart patient, shares her 2014 story about pregnancy induced heart failure. Learn about why women should listen to their bodies and how the amazing teams from The Heart Hospital and The Women's Hospital helped save Courtney and her baby's life.
     

  • Minimizing Visitors in the Hospital

    Gretchen Moody, RN, IBCLC, Community Education, Lactation and Patient Experience Coordinator

    Can you believe it’s here? The day that your baby is born has finally arrived! Friends and family are excited and eager to meet the new addition to your family. Grandmas can’t wait to get their hands on that sweet baby and they will…in time.





     

  • Dear New Mom, Don't Forget About YOU

    Constantine Scordalakes, MD, Women's Health Care P.C.

    The postpartum period—the days and weeks after giving birth--involves many emotional and physical changes for you as a new mother.  It also involves learning how to care for your newborn and how to function with the new demands at home. Adequate rest, good nutrition, and support from family and friends are crucial during the first few weeks after delivery to allow you to rebuild your strength.


     

  • 10 Baby Necessities: What Are They?

    Jenna Andrews, Community Engagement, and Experienced Mom

    You are in Babies R Us. Your husband has the scanner gun because, let’s be honest, the only way you could get him to join you was by promising he could play with the scanner gun. The haunting memory of registering for your wedding gifts 9 months prior is coming back. You are overwhelmed. You have never had a baby before! How are you supposed to know what you need?!

  • Pregnancy and Infant Loss

    Laura Lackey, BSN, RNC-OB, CPLC Bereavement Coordinator, The Women's Hospital

    October is National Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness month.  The loss of a pregnancy or baby is a life changing event.  No matter the gestational age of the little one, you may hurt physically, emotionally, mentally and spiritually.  The loss of a little one is not something families “just get over.”  Families grieve and mourn and eventually learn to live a “new normal” life. 

  • Flu Vaccinations and Pregnant Women

    Carrye Daum, MDOB/GYN, Women’s Healthcare P.C.

    The flu shot has traditionally been an important part of a pregnant woman’s prenatal care. This year, the flu shot has become a controversial issue due to a recent study and proposed association between the flu shot and miscarriage.  Learn more about the study and flu vaccinations so you are knowledgeable and informed.

     

  • The Importance of Folic Acid

    Jennifer Deutsch, RD, Nutrition Services/Dietician Manager at The Women's Hospital
     
    Taking a prenatal vitamin with folic acid before and during pregnancy can help prevent birth defects of your baby's brain and spinal cord. The CDC suggests that you start taking folic acid supplements daily for at least one month before you become pregnant and continue during pregnancy.

     

  • What’s Happening to My Body? 10 Common Pregnancy Discomforts

    Rachel Beier, BSN, RNC-OB, Maternal Care Advisor at The Women's Hospital

    There can be many discomforts to a woman's body that may accompany pregnancy. Consulting with your doctor is always an important thing to do when suffering from any sort of pain, but you may find these tips below to be helpful to ease common pregnancy discomforts. 

  • Keeping Your Relationship Healthy During Pregnancy and Parenthood

    Cynthia Nunn, RNC-OB, Maternal Care Advisor at The Women's Hospital

    During my first pregnancy, I remember being tired all the time. Like, all the time. So unbelievably tired! There were moments I literally thought I was a crazy person.
     
    People had warned us of the effects a newborn would have on our life. However, we couldn’t really see past the rose-colored glasses which displayed the perfect little family and the perfect little child. Sleep deprivation was not part of the image portrayed in our minds. Yet this became a huge reality that neither myself, nor Ryan (my husband) really knew how to handle.

  • Smoking Cessation During Pregnancy

    Janice Hatler, BSN, RN, IBCLC, Community Education at The Women's Hospital

    Smoking remains a major public health issue because of its many well -known health risks such as heart disease and cancers. The health risks are even more serious for a woman that continues to smoke during her pregnancy due to the negative affects it has on the developing baby. Some of these risks include miscarriages, delivering low birth babies, babies born with birth defects and the risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

  • Preeclampsia Awareness Month

    Dr. Spencer Kuper, Perinatologist, Tri-State Perinatology at The Women's Hospital

    May is Preeclampsia Awareness Month. Many may recognize the diagnosis, sometimes called toxemia, as the cause of a dramatic turn of events in the popular PBS drama “Downton Abbey.”

    One of the main characters, Lady Sybil Crawley, is in labor with her first child. The family’s doctor explains that Sybil has preeclampsia and is in danger. He recognizes the signs of the complication; she has protein in her urine, her ankles are swollen, and her baby is small.

  • Baby Blues

    Sarah Kluender, LSW, Wellness and Counseling Services at The Women's Hospital

    You've been preparing for the last several months for the arrival of your new baby.  The nursery is ready.  You have everything you will need in order to care for the new baby.  Delivery went well and you and baby have returned home from the hospital, but something just doesn’t seem right.
     

  • Kick Counts

    Rachel Beier, BSN, RNC, Maternal Care Advisor at The Women's Hospital

    Your baby’s movement can be an indicator of fetal well-being. Many doctors encourage mothers to track their baby’s movements starting at 28 weeks of pregnancy. Monitoring movement also helps mothers to bond with their babies and learn their activity patterns.

  • Benefits of Acupuncture During Pregnancy

    By Flora Arzanipour, MSOM, Licensed Acupuncturist, Center for Healing Arts, The Women’s Hospital

    Many pregnant women have symptoms that may cause them discomfort. Acupuncture is a safe and effective way to help relieve these symptoms. Besides providing relief for the mother, research shows that one acupuncture session a month during pregnancy can greatly improve your baby’s health.

  • Expecting Twins, Triplets, or More?!

    Rachel Beier, BSN, RNC, Maternal Care Advisor at The Women's Hospital

    Many women who are pregnant with multiples (2 or more babies) are excited but also anxious. Some common thoughts that may go through your mind when expecting multiples include...

Top Back to top