• What you need to know about Prescription Drug Abuse

    Did you know that more people abuse prescription drugs than cocaine, heroin, hallucinogens and inhalants combined?  In the U.S., one in 20 people have used prescription painkillers for non-medical reasons. 
    So how does a prescription drug abuse problem start?

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  • When You're Feeling More Than "Blue"

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a specific kind of depression that affects people seasonally. The vast majority are those who are affected during the colder/darker months. For reasons that aren't fully understood, some people develop depression that is considered to be related to less sunlight.

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  • Suicide Part II: Addressing Warning Signs

    In part one, I discussed some of the warning signs that someone may be considering suicide.  Now that you know warning signs, what should you do if you realize someone you care about is exhibiting them?
    Believe it or not, the single best thing you can do is ASK THEM about it; however, there are good and bad ways to do this.

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  • April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month.

    Learn the top 10 things you can do to prevent child abuse.

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  • Suicide Part 1: Recognizing Warning Signs

    Suicide is a leading cause of death in American teenagers, and the rate of suicide in middle aged adults has gone up more than 30% in the past decade.  Everyone should be aware of the warning signs of suicide, and what you can do if you’re worried about someone you love.  Most people give a sign or signal of some type—the key is to recognize it.  

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  • What is Palliative Care

    As defined by the Center to Advance Palliative Care: Palliative care is specialized medical care for people with serious illnesses. It is focused on providing patients with relief from the symptoms, pain, and stress of a serious illness—whatever the diagnosis.  The goal of palliative care is to relieve suffering and provide the best possible quality of life for people facing pain, symptoms and stresses caused by illness. This service improves quality of life for both the patient and the family. 

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  • Pain Management Q&A

    When someone is in pain, it affects every aspect of their life, and can lead to many questions about how to address pain.  Below, I’ve provided answers to some of the most common questions I receive as a pain management specialist.
     

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  • Kidney Stones, Part 2

    If you’ve ever had kidney stones, you know how painful the condition can be.  My previous article talked about the causes and symptoms of kidney stones, as well as the process of sometimes letting a stone “pass.”  This second article focuses on procedures used to treat kidney stones, and how to prevent stones from occurring or reoccurring.

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  • Kidney Stones, Part 1

    If you’ve ever had a kidney stone, you know how extraordinary the pain can be. I’ve had female patients who have given birth tell me that having and passing a kidney stone is worse than childbirth—without the reward at the end!

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  • Runners Foot

    Welcome runners!  This article is all about keeping YOUR feet healthy and feeling good. Not only am I a podiatrist, but I’m also an avid runner. I’ve been a runner for about 6-7 years, since I started in podiatry school.  I lost about 100 pounds before I started running, and so I took up running to keep it off. The first timed race I ever did was the Des Moines (Iowa) Half Marathon. I’ve ran numerous races since then—4 full marathons, 3 ultra marathons (50k, 50 mile), and numerous half marathons. I’m sharing some helpful tips—both personal and professional--about keeping your feet healthy.

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  • Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Asthma

    Get the basic explanations of COPD and asthma; understand how they can be prevented, diagnosed and treated; and get tips on managing both conditions—particularly in the winter.

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  • All About Exercise for Kids!

    Kids exercise all the time without even knowing it. Running around outside or playing kickball at school, are two kinds of exercise. When you exercise, you are helping build a strong body that will be able to move around and do all the stuff you need to do. 

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  • Be a Fit Kid!

    There is a lot of discussion these days about fit kids. People who care for kids, like parents, doctors, health care professionals, and teachers, want to help kids be fit and healthy. Being fit is a way of saying a person eats well, gets a lot of exercise, and has a healthy weight. If you are fit, your body works well, feels good, and looks healthy. When you are fit, you can do all the things you want to do, like run and play with your family and friends. 

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  • Joint Replacement Q & A - What to Expect

    When someone is considering joint replacement, many questions come to mind about what to expect from the overall process—before surgery, during the hospital stay, and afterwards. Each year, Deaconess performs more than 800 joint replacement surgeries. The majority of those are hip and knee replacements, but we also offer shoulder replacements as well. Because joint issues are so common, lots of people have probably had the same questions you do.

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  • Reducing Anxiety About Anxiety

    Affecting nearly one-in-five adults at some level, anxiety disorders are common and can be debilitating. Anxiety disorders can range from mild to severe to full panic.  Some people don’t realize they have an anxiety disorder until they end up in an emergency room thinking they’re having a heart attack, when they’re actually having a panic/anxiety attack.

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