Recent Articles

  • Type II Diabetes: Managing Your Options

    Mark Graves, MD, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic 

    According to the Centers for Disease Control, over 29 million Americans have diabetes and of those 29 million, one in four people do not know they have diabetes.

    Read more
  • Understanding Psoriasis

    Celine Mestel, MD, PhD, Deaconess Clinic Dermatology

    Psoriasis is a common chronic skin condition that affects about 1-2% of the population, and is one of the most common diseases that dermatologists treat.

    Read more
  • On the Run: Managing Diarrhea

    Jacklyn Oakley, MD, Deaconess Clinic Family Medicine, Gateway Professional Building
    Few things can make a person as miserable as a case of diarrhea (also known as “the runs, “the trots” and other charming euphemisms).  No one wants to talk about it, but I’m going to because I want to help you know how to treat diarrhea well at home-- both to ease the misery as quickly as possible, and to possibly prevent an unnecessary doctor’s visit.  

    Read more
  • Keeping Pain in Check

    Brittney Fulcher, NP, Deaconess Comprehensive Pain Centers
    Pain will affect everyone at some point in their life. Pain can occur suddenly or can come about slowly and may vary in intensity from mild to more severe pain. The presence of pain is usually an indication that something is wrong within the body. Pain can be acute (temporary)—usually lasting three months or less--or chronic (long term). 

    Read more
  • Knowing the Signs of Alzheimer’s

    Aziz Mehrzad, MD, Deaconess Primary Care for Seniors

    September is World Alzheimer’s Month.  More than 5 million people in the US suffer from Alzheimer’s Disease, and it is currently the 6th leading cause of death in this country—more than prostate and breast cancer combined.  

    Read more
  • Fall Prevention: Steps to Make Falls Less Likely

    Deaconess Regional Trauma Team

    Lack of exercise can lead to weak legs, which increases the chance of falling. Exercise programs can increase strength and improve balance, making falls less likely.

    Read more
  • Be Smart and Buckle Up—Here’s Why

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center
    Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death among those aged 1-54. For adults and older children (who are big enough for seat belts to fit properly), seat belt use is the most effective way to save lives and reduce injuries in crashes. 

    Read more
  • Understanding Sepsis

    Ruston Stoltz MD, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic
    Sepsis is a serious complication of an infection, and it can happen to anyone.  Young or old, sepsis can be life threatening, as between ¼ and ½ of all individuals who develop sepsis will die from it.

    Read more
  • Don’t Be Bugged by Bugs

    Rebecca Hopper, MD Internal Medicine & Pediatrics, Deaconess Clinic
    Summer is a time when most of us head for the outdoors--even if it’s just our own backyard. The season provides a time to get more exercise, eat fresh produce, and perhaps most importantly lower our stress by enjoying nature.  

    Read more
  • Walk On, and Walk Safety

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center

    Walking is one of the best things we can do to stay healthy, but only if we put safety first. We are seldom more vulnerable than when walking. It is important to pay attention to what is going on around us.

    Read more
  • Tasty & Healthy—Fresh From the Garden

    Jessica Martin, Deaconess Registered Dietitian, Clinical Dietitian

    Summer is in full swing!  Its presence surrounds you with the warmth of the sun and humidity in the air, children enjoying outdoor activities, outdoor grilling, and the wonderful fruits and vegetables the season has to offer. 

    Read more
  • Women And Bone Health

    Kim Snyder, PT, Clinic Director, High Pointe Therapy at The Women's Hospital

    Women seem to be very conscientious about getting routine exams completed.  Whether it is a mammogram, yearly physical, and colonoscopy or bone density.  When getting the results we are relieved when everything is negative or normal.

    Read more
  • 10 Things Doctors Wish Men Would Do To Protect Their Health – Part 2

    William R. Smith MD, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Downtown

    In Part One (link?) of this article, I discussed making the most of your doctor’s visit, the dangers of tobacco, the benefits of exercise and sleep, and how you can best monitor your salt intake.

    Read more
  • 10 Things Doctors Wish Men Would Do To Protect Their Health: Part 1

    William R. Smith MD, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic Downtown
    June is Men’s Health Month, a time for men to reflect on ways they can better care for themselves to be at their best for themselves and their families.
    If you could ask your doctor what he or she wishes you would do to protect your health, you’d probably get many answers. 

    Read more
  • The Survivorship Journey

    Claire Sutherby BSN, RN, CMSRN, Oncology Survivorship Nurse Navigator

    Earlier this month, Deaconess celebrated National Cancer Survivors Day with a special party for cancer survivors and their family and friends.   We celebrated because being a cancer survivor is a special thing!

    Read more
  • Drug / Alcohol Addictions and Mental Illness: Co-occurring Disorders

    Donna Lilly, MS, LCSW, LCAC, Chemical Dependency Coordinator, Deaconess Cross Pointe

    Co-occurring disorders are very common and are characterized by a co-existing mental disorder and a chemical dependency/addiction. 

    Read more
  • In the Know About Knee Pain

    Dr. Daniel Emerson, Orthopaedic Associates, Deaconess Joint Replacement Program

    If you suffer from knee pain, you’re not alone.  Out of approximately 320 million people living in the United States, more than 40 million suffer some form of arthritis.

    Read more
  • Alcohol – the Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    Donna Lilly, LCSW, LCAC, SAP, Chemical Dependency Treatment Coordinator, Deaconess Cross Pointe and Lynn Schnautz, MSN, RN, CCRN, CCNS, NP-C, Nurse Practitioner/Clinical Nurse Specialist, The Heart Hospital

    There can be a lot of confusion about alcohol and its effects on your health.  How much alcohol—and what kind—is good for you?

    Read more
  • Managing Spring Allergies

    Anne McLaughlin, MD Deaconess Clinic Allergist 

    Does this spring find you sneezing, sniffling and itching?  You’re in good company right now, in large part due to the high tree pollen counts.  

    Read more
  • Knee Osteoarthritis: Living Pain-Free

    Michelle Galen, MD, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic
    Our knees do a lot of “heavy lifting” so it’s not surprising that nearly 50% of adults will develop osteoarthritis in the knee by the age of 85.  The human knee consists of three bones (kneecap, tibia and femur) that must move in concert to allow normal range of motion.  The ends of all three bones are covered in cartilage to cushion the joint during movement.  With aging and “wear-and-tear,” the cartilage starts to wear away and the result is painful bone-on-bone friction and/or bone spurs. 

    Read more
  • COPD: Catching Your Breath

    By James Gutmann, MD  Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic
    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a lesser-known respiratory disease but is every bit as dangerous and difficult to manage as asthma.  COPD is an umbrella term for a grouping of specific symptoms that are incurable but manageable with appropriate treatment and lifestyle adjustments.  

    Read more
  • Staying Safe In Cold Weather

    By Dr. Jung Smith, Family Medicine  Deaconess Clinic Mary Street
    Frostbite, hypothermia, overexertion and falls are the most common cold-weather health hazards. Below are important tips and information for staying safe this winter.

    Read more
  • Advances in Wound Care

    Dr. Brandt Dodson, Podiatrist, Deaconess Wound Services
    Wound care is one of the most exciting and rapidly growing subspecialties of medicine.  The increase in knowledge and the addition of new technologies are a significant reason for this growth. 
    Some of the new treatment options are relatively simple while others are more complex.

    Read more
  • Caregiving Resources

    Wendi Tingley, Home Care Manager, and Shirley Gubler, Hospice Manager, Deaconess VNA Plus
    Caregiving is an increasingly-common role in America. Seniors are living longer, and often there are family members and friends who are helping to look out for their well-being.

    Read more
  • Adult Vaccines

    Rebekah Basham, PA, Deaconess Clinic Mary Street
    Most people are aware pediatric vaccinations are very important and prevent serious diseases and related complications. However, people often forget there are adult vaccinations and boosters that are recommended to keep us healthy and prevent complications associated with certain infections. 

    Read more
  • Tips for Aging Healthier & Happier

    By Becky Richardville, MSW, LCSW, Care Coordinator at Deaconess Primary Care for Seniors
    Growing older is a privilege, but let’s face it—aging definitely brings about changes in our bodies and minds.

    Read more
  • Shingles

    Dr. James Gutmann, Family Medicine Physician at Deaconess Clinic Mt. Pleasant
    In my 26 years of practicing family medicine, I have treated hundreds of patients with shingles and seen how painful and debilitating it can be. My goal in writing this article is to help people either learn how to potentially avoid shingles, OR help them know what to do if they get shingles. 

    Read more
  • Single out Shingles: New Medical Advances for Combating Shingles

    Dr. James Gutman, Family Medicine Deaconess Clinic
    Chickenpox are nearly a childhood rite of passage…  Quarantine from others, being doused in calamine lotion and strong inclinations to take a hairbrush to those itchy miserable lesions.  The varicella virus (or chickenpox) primes patients to develop herpes zoster later on in life.

    Read more
  • Who Decides, and When? - Understanding Advance Directives.

    Peggy Matacale, Chaplain, Deaconess Religious Life, and Candace Foster, Deaconess Privacy Officer
    Here at Deaconess, patients and family members are making decisions on others’ behalf every single day.  Sometimes the situation is sudden, such as after a car crash.  In other situations, a family member has been in a gradual decline. But in all circumstances it can be a difficult time, so having the right information, with the desired decision-makers, is very important.

    Read more
  • How To Get A Good Night’s Sleep

    Getting a good night’s sleep is a critical part of living a healthy life.  Sleep is when our bodies repair themselves, and inadequate sleep has been linked to heart disease, stroke, diabetes, weight gain and depression.

    Read more
  • Deaconess Wound Services - a Physician’s Perspective

    Brandt Dodson, DPM
    Chronic non-healing wounds are a daily fact of life for many.  Whether they result in lost wages, prolonged hospitalization or the loss of a limb, these wounds can be as life-altering as they are costly. Deaconess Wound Services addresses this problem with the most advanced techniques available.

    Read more
  • YOUR DIET and Your Hearing

    Ann B. Raibley, Certified Clinical Audiologist
    Protecting your ears from hazardous noise and keeping ear infections at bay are fundamental ways to minimize hearing loss. However, a healthy lifestyle with exercise and a balanced diet can also help maintain hearing health.

    Read more
  • Alcohol and Seniors

    When does drinking become a problem? The aging population is not immune to alcohol abuse.  For men and women 65 years of age or older, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse considers one drink per day to be the maximum amount for “moderate” alcohol use. 

    Read more
  • Peripheral Neuropathy

    Dr. Dodson explains Peripheral Neuropathy and who this painful condition can be treated so you can live an active, pain-reduced life.

    Watch video
  • Preparing For Your Cancer Journey

    Learning that you or someone you love has cancer is a life-changing moment. After hearing the word “cancer,” people are often overwhelmed, anxious and fearful.  You may feel paralyzed and numb, not knowing what to do next. There are many aspects to preparing for your cancer journey—medical, financial, physical, and emotional.  

    Read more
  • Free Lung Cancer Screenings for Veterans

    November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month. This is such an important awareness initiative, because many people don’t realize that lung cancer is so prevalent and deadly.  More people die of lung cancer than of breast, colon and prostate cancer combined. Also, Veterans are at an even higher risk of lung cancer due to the prevalence of smoking in the Armed Services.  

    Read more
  • Fall Prevention

    Kim Childers, MSW, LSW Care Coordinator at Deaconess Primary Care for Seniors

    Complications due to falls are the leading cause of death from injury in seniors age 65 and older. Prevention of falls in the home is so important. You’re protecting someone’s vitality, independence and life. 

    Read more
  • Medicare 101 - Part One Two

    There is a lot of confusion related to Medicare and Medicare supplement plans. This two part series answers several of the questions you or your family members might have.

    Read more
  • Medicare 101 - Part One

    There is a lot of confusion related to Medicare and Medicare supplement plans. This two part series answers several of the questions you or your family members might have.

    Read more
  • Weekend Warrior to Total Knee

    The normal human knee will tolerate the stresses of life – walking, lifting, running, sports, even extreme sports without wearing out enough to ever require a total joint; but, not every knee is normal.  There are many circumstances that cause a knee to wear out and get osteoarthritis.  Plus, the life expectancy in the year 1900 was about 50 – now it is in to the late 80’s; so, we have over 30 extra years to get osteoarthritis.

    Read more
  • Clearing Up the Question about Hip Fractures: When to Replace, When to Fix.

    Hip fractures in the United States represent an epidemic of disease.  As of 2003, there were 2.25 million hip fractures in the world.  Hip fractures are increasing at a rate of approximately 8% every year due to the population aging and increased activity of our seniors and the community.

    Read more
  • Defining Arthritis

     Arthritis is a very common condition, affecting as many as half of all Americans in their lifetime. In my more than 20 years of practice, I’ve seen thousands of patients who are suffering from arthritis. It can be a painful and debilitating disease. However, arthritis is a broad term that describes one of several conditions.

    Read more
  • Stroke. Reduce Your Risk, and Know the Signs

    Stroke is the leading cause of long-term adult disability and the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. Because of these serious statistics, I want everyone to know more about stroke risk factors, stroke signs and symptoms, and the importance of immediate treatment if a stroke is suspected.

    Read more
  • Shingles - Painful and Preventable. Patient & Physician Perspectives Part 1

    Shingles: A Patient’s Perspective – Part One
    Many people don’t know that about one in three people in the US will develop shingles during their lifetime, and older people are at the greatest risk for developing shingles. In fact, half of all people who live to age 85 will develop shingles at some point.

    Read more
  • A Doctor's Take on Osteoporosis

    Osteoporosis is a disease in which the density and quality of bone are reduced—bones actually become weaker. As bones become more porous and fragile, the risk of fracture is greatly increased. The loss of bone occurs silently and progressively. Often there are no symptoms until the first fracture occurs.

    Read more
  • It's Raining Now! What do you do when someone you love is not doing as well as they used to.

    Realizing that someone you love is not functioning as well at home as they used to can come as a shock; discovering what in-home care costs can be even more surprising, particularly since many people believe that Medicare or traditional health insurance will pay for all types of assistance.

    Read more
  • What is Palliative Care

    As defined by the Center to Advance Palliative Care: Palliative care is specialized medical care for people with serious illnesses. It is focused on providing patients with relief from the symptoms, pain, and stress of a serious illness—whatever the diagnosis.  The goal of palliative care is to relieve suffering and provide the best possible quality of life for people facing pain, symptoms and stresses caused by illness. This service improves quality of life for both the patient and the family. 

    Read more
  • Pain Management Q&A

    When someone is in pain, it affects every aspect of their life, and can lead to many questions about how to address pain.  Below, I’ve provided answers to some of the most common questions I receive as a pain management specialist.

    Read more
  • Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Asthma

    Get the basic explanations of COPD and asthma; understand how they can be prevented, diagnosed and treated; and get tips on managing both conditions—particularly in the winter.

    Read more
  • Joint Replacement Q & A - What to Expect

    When someone is considering joint replacement, many questions come to mind about what to expect from the overall process—before surgery, during the hospital stay, and afterwards. Each year, Deaconess performs more than 800 joint replacement surgeries. The majority of those are hip and knee replacements, but we also offer shoulder replacements as well. Because joint issues are so common, lots of people have probably had the same questions you do.

    Read more
  • Can You Hear Me Now? 9 Common Questions About Hearing Loss

    Did you know that about 20 percent of adults in the United States report some degree of hearing loss?  By the time people reach age 65, that number rises to 1 in 3.  As an audiologist, there are many common questions I receive about hearing loss, so I want to share those—and their answers—with you.

    Read more
  • Be Stroke Smart

    We want every person I meet to know three things about stroke:  What causes them, how to prevent them, and how to recognize the signs and symptoms of stroke. Stroke is serious.  It’s the leading cause of long-term adult disability in the US, and it’s one of the leading causes of death.

    Read more