Seniors

Recent Articles

  • Weekend Warrior to Total Knee

    The normal human knee will tolerate the stresses of life – walking, lifting, running, sports, even extreme sports without wearing out enough to ever require a total joint; but, not every knee is normal.  There are many circumstances that cause a knee to wear out and get osteoarthritis.  Plus, the life expectancy in the year 1900 was about 50 – now it is in to the late 80’s; so, we have over 30 extra years to get osteoarthritis.

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  • Clearing Up the Question about Hip Fractures: When to Replace, When to Fix.

    Hip fractures in the United States represent an epidemic of disease.  As of 2003, there were 2.25 million hip fractures in the world.  Hip fractures are increasing at a rate of approximately 8% every year due to the population aging and increased activity of our seniors and the community.

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  • Defining Arthritis

     Arthritis is a very common condition, affecting as many as half of all Americans in their lifetime. In my more than 20 years of practice, I’ve seen thousands of patients who are suffering from arthritis. It can be a painful and debilitating disease. However, arthritis is a broad term that describes one of several conditions.

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  • Stroke. Reduce Your Risk, and Know the Signs

    Stroke is the leading cause of long-term adult disability and the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. Because of these serious statistics, I want everyone to know more about stroke risk factors, stroke signs and symptoms, and the importance of immediate treatment if a stroke is suspected.

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  • Shingles - Painful and Preventable. Patient & Physician Persepctives Part 1

    Shingles: A Patient’s Perspective – Part One
    Many people don’t know that about one in three people in the US will develop shingles during their lifetime, and older people are at the greatest risk for developing shingles. In fact, half of all people who live to age 85 will develop shingles at some point.

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  • A Doctor's Take on Osteoporosis

    Osteoporosis is a disease in which the density and quality of bone are reduced—bones actually become weaker. As bones become more porous and fragile, the risk of fracture is greatly increased. The loss of bone occurs silently and progressively. Often there are no symptoms until the first fracture occurs.

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  • It's Raining Now! What do you do when someone you love is not doing as well as they used to.

    Realizing that someone you love is not functioning as well at home as they used to can come as a shock; discovering what in-home care costs can be even more surprising, particularly since many people believe that Medicare or traditional health insurance will pay for all types of assistance.

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  • What is Palliative Care

    As defined by the Center to Advance Palliative Care: Palliative care is specialized medical care for people with serious illnesses. It is focused on providing patients with relief from the symptoms, pain, and stress of a serious illness—whatever the diagnosis.  The goal of palliative care is to relieve suffering and provide the best possible quality of life for people facing pain, symptoms and stresses caused by illness. This service improves quality of life for both the patient and the family. 

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  • Pain Management Q&A

    When someone is in pain, it affects every aspect of their life, and can lead to many questions about how to address pain.  Below, I’ve provided answers to some of the most common questions I receive as a pain management specialist.
     

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  • Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Asthma

    Get the basic explanations of COPD and asthma; understand how they can be prevented, diagnosed and treated; and get tips on managing both conditions—particularly in the winter.

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  • Joint Replacement Q & A - What to Expect

    When someone is considering joint replacement, many questions come to mind about what to expect from the overall process—before surgery, during the hospital stay, and afterwards. Each year, Deaconess performs more than 800 joint replacement surgeries. The majority of those are hip and knee replacements, but we also offer shoulder replacements as well. Because joint issues are so common, lots of people have probably had the same questions you do.

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  • Can You Hear Me Now? 9 Common Questions About Hearing Loss

    Did you know that about 20 percent of adults in the United States report some degree of hearing loss?  By the time people reach age 65, that number rises to 1 in 3.  As an audiologist, there are many common questions I receive about hearing loss, so I want to share those—and their answers—with you.

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  • Be Stroke Smart

    I want every person I meet to know three things about stroke:  What causes them, how to prevent them, and how to recognize the signs and symptoms of stroke. Stroke is serious.  It’s the leading cause of long-term adult disability in the US, and it’s one of the leading causes of death.

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