Men


Being a man means taking care of things, including your health.  Taking action by visiting the doctor regularly, checking up on any health concerns, and making healthy lifestyle choices can help a man be at his best.         

Related Information

  • Understanding Hospice

    Chanda Liebo, Director of Hospice Operations, and Kim Anderson, Inpatient Clinical Manager, Deaconess VNA Home Care & Hospice

    There are a many questions regarding hospice, such as, “What services are included?”, “How is it paid for?”, and more.  Below are answers to some of these most common questions, as well as additional information about why hospice is a wonderful service and resource for families when a loved one has a terminal condition. 

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  • Screening for Lung Cancer Saves Lives

    Dr. Jugesh Cheema, Radiologist, Evansville Radiology
    Mariah Atkinson, BSN, RN, Deaconess Cancer Services Nurse Navigator


    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death, killing more Americans than breast, prostate and colon cancer combined. Fortunately, there is a screening tool available for those at risk for lung cancer, but many people don’t take advantage of this option.

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  • Type II Diabetes: Managing Your Options

    Mark Graves, MD, Internal Medicine, Deaconess Clinic 

    According to the Centers for Disease Control, over 29 million Americans have diabetes and of those 29 million, one in four people do not know they have diabetes.

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  • Understanding Psoriasis

    Celine Mestel, MD, PhD, Deaconess Clinic Dermatology

    Psoriasis is a common chronic skin condition that affects about 1-2% of the population, and is one of the most common diseases that dermatologists treat.

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  • On the Run: Managing Diarrhea

    Jacklyn Oakley, MD, Deaconess Clinic Family Medicine, Gateway Professional Building
     
    Few things can make a person as miserable as a case of diarrhea (also known as “the runs, “the trots” and other charming euphemisms).  No one wants to talk about it, but I’m going to because I want to help you know how to treat diarrhea well at home-- both to ease the misery as quickly as possible, and to possibly prevent an unnecessary doctor’s visit.  

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  • Keeping Pain in Check

    Brittney Fulcher, NP, Deaconess Comprehensive Pain Centers
     
    Pain will affect everyone at some point in their life. Pain can occur suddenly or can come about slowly and may vary in intensity from mild to more severe pain. The presence of pain is usually an indication that something is wrong within the body. Pain can be acute (temporary)—usually lasting three months or less--or chronic (long term). 

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  • Knowing the Signs of Alzheimer’s

    Aziz Mehrzad, MD, Deaconess Primary Care for Seniors
     

    September is World Alzheimer’s Month.  More than 5 million people in the US suffer from Alzheimer’s Disease, and it is currently the 6th leading cause of death in this country—more than prostate and breast cancer combined.  

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  • Understanding Hand, Foot & Mouth Disease

    Capri Weyer, MD Pediatrics Deaconess Clinic 

    Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is a viral infection most commonly caused by coxsackievirus.  Although it can be seen in any age group, it is usually seen in young children. “Outbreaks” are also common in late summer and early fall—August into October.

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  • Be Smart and Buckle Up—Here’s Why

    Lu Weil, Injury Prevention Coordinator, Deaconess Regional Trauma Center
     
    Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death among those aged 1-54. For adults and older children (who are big enough for seat belts to fit properly), seat belt use is the most effective way to save lives and reduce injuries in crashes. 

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  • Understanding Sepsis

    Ruston Stoltz MD, Family Medicine, Deaconess Clinic
     
    Sepsis is a serious complication of an infection, and it can happen to anyone.  Young or old, sepsis can be life threatening, as between ¼ and ½ of all individuals who develop sepsis will die from it.

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